Saturday, May 31, 2014

An Overview on LLC Taxation

Calculating and paying for taxes is never easy. It's especially tricky if you are a member of a limited liability company, since this business structure allows for a wide range of tax treatment options. Lucky for you, there's this guide to help you navigate the murky waters of LLC taxation.

General Rules

How your LLC will be taxed depends on whether the IRS views your company as a sole proprietorship, a partnership, an S corporation, or a C corporation. The IRS may tax the individual members, the LLC as a whole, or both. Remember that the LLC is legally considered a different business entity from the members comprising it. Understanding this distinction will make the concept of LLC taxation less confusing.

Sole Proprietorship

LLC taxation for one-member companies is straightforward: the lone owner pays the LLC's taxes based on the company's net income. There is no need to file separate returns for the owner and the company.You can choose to have your company treated as a corporation-provided that you also allow it to be taxed as such.

Partnerships/Multi-Owner LLCs

Multi-owner LLCs file two separate tax returns: the 1065 partnership tax return for its business income, and the Schedule SE tax form for the self-employment taxes of each member. Self-employment taxes depend on the agreed profit-loss sharing between the members.

C Corporation

LLC taxation rules for this business structure work like that of a standard corporation. Essentially, the aggregate profits of the C corporation are taxed according to the prevailing corporate tax rate, and any profits distributed as dividends among members are taxed according to the dividend rate. Though the members don't need to file individual returns, they still need to pay payroll taxes in behalf of their employees.

S Corporation

The LLC taxation system for S corps is unusual. A return is filed in behalf of the LLC (i.e. Form 1120S), but the company's profits aren't taxed as a whole. Instead, tax money comes straight out of the individual members' pockets, again according to their operating agreement. The members declare these taxes via individual returns.

The LLC taxation system is only one of several considerations you have to bear in mind when choosing an LLC structure. All of these have their pros and cons, and it's important that you do your research on which structure is in the best interest of your company. Always take time to consult the experts, like your lawyer, accountant, or even registered agent.

If you are looking for information on Tennessee LLC taxation, click on the link. Or you can visit
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Friday, May 30, 2014

LLC Tips - Converting a General Partnership to a Limited Liability Company

You and your business partner have been running your business as general partnership for the past several years. You have been reading about limited liability companies (LLCs) and have decided that your business should really be operated as an LLC. Is it too late? Can you still convert your business from a general partnership to an LLC? Yes, you can!

Why would a business want convert to a limited liability company from a partnership? The reason that a business would want to convert from a general partnership to an LLC is to allow the partners to shield themselves personal liability for obligations of the business. Every partner in a general partnership is liability for all of the debts of the business. A member of an LLC, on the other hand is can generally only lose his contribution to the LLC, nothing more. He is not responsible for the debts of the LLC.

The limitation typically only applies to liabilities arising after the conversion. It is unlikely that a general partner will be released from personal liability to the partnership's creditors for the business's debts existing before the conversion. A member will avoid personal liability for debts incurred by the LLC but will remain personally liable for debts of the general partnership which are transferred to and assumed by the LLC in the conversion.

The procedures for converting a general partnership into an LLC differs from state to state. Originally, most state laws contained no provision allowing one type of business entity to change into an LLC. At that time, if you had a partnership, you had to first dissolve the partnership and distribute its properties and liabilities to all of the partners. At that point, the partners would contribute those assets and liabilities to a newly-formed LLC and become members in the new LLC.

Today, most states have statutory provisions that allow a partnership to be converted into an LLC in one simple step. For example, in Illinois, once the partners approve the conversion, a Statement of Conversion is filed along with Articles of Organization for the new LLC. It is as simple as that.
The conversion is also simple from a tax standpoint. In several private letter rulings the IRS has addressed the conversion of a general partnership into an LLC. The rulings have clarified that neither the partners nor the partnership recognize any gain or loss on the conversion. Also, the partnership continues to exist uninterrupted for tax purposes and, for computing capital gain if he later disposes of his LLC membership interest, the length of time that the partner owned his partnership interest carries over to his LLC interest.

An LLC is by far the most popular choice for new businesses being formed today. If you chose to start your business as a general partnership, the good news is that it is not too late to make the change!

David K. Staub is a business attorney who writes and lectures frequently on various business, legal and tax topics. He is the author of the Limited Liability Company Center, a free resource of information on how to organize an LLC.
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Thursday, May 29, 2014

How to Know Which State to Incorporate Your Business

You might not want to incorporate in a state other than the one where your company is doing business, attorney Mark Kohler says.

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Situations Where Your Last Will May Be Considered Void

Drafting a last will and testament is something we only hope to do one time. Creating a document that specifies our wishes after our deaths can cause some anxiety in that we are reminded of our mortality, but more than that making changes to a will can cause headaches if not done correctly. You also risk voiding your will under certain circumstances. In order to keep your friends and loved ones from inheriting any headaches along with your estate, it is important to know exactly what events can void your will.

If your will is judged void after your death, it opens the door to any number of disputes between family and friends as they argue over dispersing your assets. Charities you wished to benefit from your generosity may not receive the funds you set aside for them, and even your burial plans may be altered. It is important, therefore, to make sure you following everything to the letter. Here are a few situations that could lead to voiding your will.

1) You make unauthorized changes. When you complete a will, it is typically signed and witnessed, and notarized. If you make written additions or deletions anytime after that period, somebody could contest the validity of the will and cause problems. If you want to make corrections after the legalities are complete, you can either destroy the current will and start over, or draft a codicil to accompany the will you current have.

2) You were not of sound mind when you wrote the will. Some people may be pressured or heavily encouraged to draft a document in order to bring peace of mind for your family. However, a will written under duress or other influence could be proven invalid if somebody believes you were not of sound mind at the time. You want to make it perfectly clear that your wishes are your own, and that you have not been forced to write anything you didn't want to write.

3) Changes in marital status. Depending on the laws in your state, a will drafted before a legal marriage or divorce could allow a party to contest your will if you do not have it changed. If you have a will ready and decide to marry or remarry, speak with your attorney about what needs to be done to ensure your wishes are kept intact.

Take care to know what factors could render your last will and testament void.

Kathryn Lively is a freelance writer specializing in articles on North Carolina lawyers and Outer Banks lawyers.
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Sunday, May 25, 2014

Estate Planning : Must an Executor Notify a Beneficiary?

In some states, according to estate law, executors do not have to notify beneficiaries of wills. Find out when an executor must notify a beneficiary from an estate planning and probate lawyer in this free video on estate law.

Saturday, May 24, 2014

What Are the Benefits of an Uncontested Divorce?

When you hear "uncontested divorce", also known as no fault divorce in California, you probably think of a couple who amicably and in a friendly manner decide to call it quits. While this is surely the case in some situations, choosing to go the uncontested divorce route may be a financial decision rather than an emotional one. Just like any divorce, there is the chance that an uncontested will see unpleasantness and bitterness to some degree.

So why would you choose this path if you are unhappy with your former partner? Well, for one an uncontested divorce is much cheaper than a contested divorce in most cases. The couple could even file for divorce without the assistance of lawyers, although at the very least speaking with an attorney is often helpful and important in protecting one's rights.

What's more, it allows the couple to end their marriage quickly and with as little animosity as possible, even if the former couple isn't walking away from the marriage with the best of feelings towards one another. You probably will not agree on every single aspect of the divorce, but after a little negotiating, compromising and talking through the issues, couples are often able to reach an agreement without fighting each other in court.

Getting back to the money-saving benefit of an uncontested divorce, the extra cash that may otherwise go to a divorce attorney can be used to rebuild your life. You won't have a partner with whom you can split your expenses, including rent, car payments, utilities, etc., and if you have kids you'll be able to pamper them a little bit as they deal with the divorce.

There are some cases in which a no fault divorce may not be right. If abuse exists in the relationship, negotiating may be difficult for the victim of abuse, as intimidation and possibly fear will put create an uneven playing field. If either you or your spouse decides that you want to walk away with most of your assets, or if you are not on speaking terms with your spouse, an uncontested divorce may not be the best of choices.

In the end, though, many choose an uncontested divorce because of the money, headaches and hassle that it saves them.

Justin recommends to look for more information on a Uncontested Divorce Lawyer or just schedule a consultation with a Temecula Divorce Lawyer visit the offices of Diefer Law Group
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Friday, May 23, 2014

Do You Need a Registered Agent When You Form an LLC or Corporation?

When you're busy planning the formation of an LLC or corporation, its easy to overlook some details, even the important ones. Every corporation or LLC must have an agent who is designated to receive official correspondence and notice in case of lawsuit.

Registered agents are also known as resident agents or statutory agents, and they serve an important role in your company.

In most states, the resident agent must be either an adult living in the state of formation with a street address, or a corporation or LLC with a business office in the state that provides registered agent services. If you form an LLC or incorporate in your home state, any officer or director, or manager or member in the case of an LLC, may act as the resident agent. Having a third party act as the statutory agent comes with some advantages, however, including increased privacy and reducing the risk that you will be surprised at home with court papers for a lawsuit.

Doing Business in Another State

So, what happens after you incorporate in Delaware, for example, and then decide to start doing business in New Jersey? At this point, you will need registered agent service in the new state. The agent's address can also be where the state send annual reports, tax notices and notices for yearly renewals of the business's charter.

You will be required to maintain a resident agent in any state where your company does business, and the agent's office address and name must be included in the articles of incorporation giving public notice.

Finding a Statutory Agent

Most corporate service companies provide registered agent service, which includes forwarding any tax notices or official documents from the Secretary of State and the acceptance of legal service of process to forward to your company. Basic levels of service include a legitimate working office, compliance management, information shielding and document organization as well.

Agents, or statutory agents, serve an important role. After all, you will lose by default if you can't be served or the paperwork isn't passed to you properly, so a reliable registered agent is your first line of defense against opportunistic lawyers. It's usually best to choose someone else as your registered agent, as you don't want to be served in front of employees or customers in a working office, and a good agent will protect your personal information from appearing online.

Christine Layton writes for USA Corporate Services, a business service company specializing in helping business owners incorporate or form an LLC and decide which of the types of companies is best for their business.
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Thursday, May 22, 2014

Advance Directives And End Of Life Expenses

Few if anyone would disagree with the ethical premise that a society should do everything possible to make sick people well. But this ethos seems to have gotten confused with something entirely different: the practice of keeping dying people alive as long as possible without concern for their discomfort, loss of dignity, and financial ruin. When you look at the statistics surrounding the issue of end-of-life expenditures they are truly incredible. In 2008 Medicare alone paid out $50 billion to physicians and medical centers to cover costs associated with the last two months of the lives of dying individuals. To put this into perspective, this was more than the annual budget that was allotted to the Department of Education at that time.

It is estimated that between 18-20% of people who pass away each year do so in the intensive care units of hospitals, and the cost for each day in ICU can reach as much as $10,000. This is in spite of the fact that most people polled do not want to be kept alive through aggressive and intrusive medical procedures when there is no hope for recovery. 75% of American die in hospitals or nursing homes, and in 2010 the average cost for a year in a private room in a nursing home was around $83,000. More people are living longer these days as we all know, these costs are rising all the time, and we are already faced with a federal budget deficit that exceeds $1 trillion.

How you feel about being kept alive through feeding tubes and life support systems at the end of your life is a personal decision. You can state your wishes concerning the types of medical procedures you approve and disapprove of through the execution of a living will, and you can add a health care proxy to name someone to make decisions for you in the event of your incapacitation. It may be a good idea to come to terms with the line that exists between medical issues and end-of-life issues and decide how you would like to proceed from a fully informed and personally empowered perspective.

Alan L. Augulis is a leading provider of expert estate planning guidance in Warren, NJ. For more information on advance directives and other estate planning services, visit our website.
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Monday, May 19, 2014

Reasons Why Making a Will Is Important

Most people tend to procrastinate about making their last will and testament, primarily because it is a harsh reminder of our mortality and as such, we prefer not to have anything to do with it until the time comes when it is too late to do something about it. In most funerals you attend, you often hear people ask if the deceased left any will and the most common answer being "no" or "none."

While making a will is certainly no one's favorite thing to do, what many people don't realize is that it can alleviate your fears of death because once you decide to make it, you will be assured that the loved ones you leave behind will be taken care of properly and that your estate won't be spent on legal expenses from contests initiated by your heirs.

However, that's not to say you can't die without ever making a will. In fact, there are two ways by which you can die without a will, the first being because you never wrote one and the second being, the will you wrote was declared invalid by probate court. In both cases, this is referred to as dying intestate or dying without a valid will.

When you die intestate, that means the control of your property and the distribution of your assets will be done under the laws of intestacy. If for example you co-owned a property with two other people, the laws of intestacy dictate that the ownership will not transfer to the other co-owners but your heirs, which is one situation that the remaining co-owners may contest.

There are four types of assets where these laws don't apply and they are as follows:

  • Life insurance and retirement plan proceeds
  • Properties that are jointly owned with a right of survivorship
  • Properties held in a living trust
  • Properties under the community property system

The entire purpose of making a will is to make sure your property and assets are distributed to people and organizations as you intended. To make sure this happens you can elect an executor of your will to make sure every condition in your will is fulfilled. Choosing an executor means you should choose someone you trust like a relative or a close friend. If you don't have neither to choose from, then it should be someone who is dependable, trustworthy, well-organized, good with paperwork and diligent about meeting deadlines.

And lastly, making a will doesn't have to follow a strict guideline because what will matter is not how the will was written but the conditions written within. There are many ways these days to write your own will, such as software that you can use just by asking you a few questions where your answers will be inserted into a ready-made will. Having a will ready will also save you from having to hire a lawyer to help you write one - not only is it time-consuming to find a good lawyer, it is also quite expensive to have one draft your will for you.

When you want to learn more about how to avoid problems after you've gone, check out this post about will disputes so that your loved ones are well taken care of when it matters.
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Sunday, May 18, 2014

How to Properly Use a Power of Attorney

A power of attorney is a legal document that authorizes one person to act on behalf of another in the legal or business dealings of the person authorizing the other. This type of document has a lot of relevance when, for example, somebody needs to execute some business or legal matter but is unable to do so for whatever reason. In the absence of the person, another person may be authorized to execute the matter through use of a power of attorney, which in common law systems or in civil law systems, authorizes another person to act on behalf of the person so authorizing the other. The person authorizing is known as the "principal" and the person authorized is called the "agent". The agent may, on behalf of the principal, do such lawful acts such as signing the principal's name on documents.

An agent is a fiduciary for the principal and, as this is an important relationship between principal and agent, the law requires that the agent be a person of impeccable integrity who shall always act honestly and in the best interests of the principal. In case a contract exists between the agent and the principal for remuneration or other form of monetary payment being made to the agent, such contract may be separate and in writing to that effect. However, the power of attorney may also be verbal, though many an institution, bank, hospital as well as the Internal Revenue Service of the USA requires a written power of attorney to be submitted by the agent before it is honored.

The "Equal Dignity Rule" is the principle of law that has the same requirements of the agent as it does to the principal. Suppose that the agent has a power of attorney that authorizes him or her to sign the sales deed of the principal's house and that such sales deed should be notarized by law. The power of attorney does not absolve the agent from the necessity of having the sales deed notarized. His or her signature to the sales deed must also be notarized.

There are two types of powers of attorney. One is the "special power of attorney" and the other, "limited power of attorney." The power of attorney may be specific to some special instance or it may be general and encompasses whatever the court specifies to be its scope. The document will lapse when the grantor (principal) dies. In case the principal should become incapacitated due to some physical or mental illness, his power of attorney will be revoked, under the common law. There is an exception. In case the principal had in the document specifically stated that the agent may continue to act on his behalf even if the principal became incapacitated, then the power of attorney would continue to enjoy legal sanction.

In some of the States in the USA, there is a "springing power of attorney" which kicks in only in case the grantor (principal) becomes incapacitated or some future act or circumstance occurs. Unless the agreement has been made irrevocable, the agreement may be revoked by the principal by informing the agent that he is revoking the power of attorney.

Making use of standardized power of attorney forms helps in framing a legally sound and mutually beneficial relationship for principal and agent. With the ease of use and ready availability of such forms, it is highly recommended that they be utilized when thinking of granting a power of attorney to someone. However, care should be taken not to let unscrupulous persons defraud innocent persons such as the elderly through ill-conceived agreements.

Wade Anderson is a CPA and operates
Click to view a Power of Attorney Form

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Saturday, May 17, 2014

Probate Law 101

Probate law is a legal process that no one ever wants to deal with. When someone who has a valid will passes away an administrative process goes into effect which determines how the individual's property and belongings (termed their estate) will be handled. The process of this is great to know as both the person who is writing the will and the people who will be involved in the process should the unthinkable happen so that everything is understood and further pain is avoided. Estate planning is a lot better than no estate planning at all where motives have historically been influenced by relationships between friends and family and the value of the estate.

What is probate?

The term probate can be used in a variety of related ways. However the most common context is known as the process that occurs within the legal system administering your estate after someone has deceased. Each person listed on the will, must apply for a grant of Probate.

What if I have no will?

The Probate Law will only take effect when a valid will has been written by the deceased person. If the deceased does not have a recognized will, then the probate is invalid and an administrator needs to be made official (generally the next of kin). This process can be complicated and takes a lot longer than if a will was written.

What is included in an estate?

The probate lawfully considers an estate to be all assets that are owned fully or partially by the deceased. This includes future pay checks from work before passing, household goods, property and anything else that ownership can be determined by various forms of legal documents. All of the above can be probated by a local Probate Council except for real estate. Probate law for real estate is under the jurisdiction that the property is located. If someone wants to contest the ownership of any part of the estate, they must go through the appropriate legal channels.

Getting the process started?

If someone has deceased, their will is not official until it has been submitted for probate. Therefore when estate planning, you will need to tell someone where they can locate your will if required. Although there are some parts of the probate court procedures that are informal, there are severe penalties if the will is not produced within a certain time, is concealed or destroyed.

Estate planning is not enjoyable to think about. However, by doing so you do make things clearer for those who are mentioned in your will. The probate law may seem like a nuisance given the circumstances that the law is applied however is required though to keep everyone in check. It also simplifies the process as there have been situations where assets of the deceased are fought over for years resulting in ongoing pain for all parties involved. Ultimately, who do you want to go through your underwear draw?
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Friday, May 16, 2014

California DUI Expungement - Expunge Your Record and Move on With Your Life

Having a DUI arrest or conviction record can tarnish your reputation and make it difficult for you to get a job, loan, college, military etc. Fortunately, California State allows you to expunge your DUI record thereby, helping you to leave behind your past crimes and move on with your life. However to obtain DUI expungement in California you must meet certain requirements. Also, your expungement is not guaranteed even after it's ordered.

Can your case be expunged?

Under California law, your case can be expunged if you meet the following requirements:

1. if you fulfilled the conditions of probation.

2. if you are not presently serving a sentence or on probation for any other crime.

3. if you are not presently charged for any other crime.

Also other factors are considered before granting an expungement such as whether you are a minor or an adult at the time of your conviction, whether you are charged for misdemeanor or felony, and whether or not you were sentenced to a state prison. If you meet such requirements your case will be expunged.

What happens when the expungement is granted?

Under California law, expunging means withdrawal of plea of guilty or no contest and entering a plea of not guilty or setting aside the judgment if you are found guilty in the trial. Once granted, you are thereafter, relieved from all the consequences resulting from a DUI violation, though with some exceptions.

Your life after expunging DUI record:

Job Applications:

As per the California law, when applying for a private job you can firmly answer "no" to the question "have you ever been convicted of a crime?" in the application form. Also, your DUI record will not show up when conducting a background check.

But expungement does not serve its purpose when you apply for a government job. Your DUI convictions will be revealed as expunged. It's not very helpful though. Also, your expunged records are seen as a prior conviction, meaning, it can be used for enhancing the penalties of your future DUI conviction in case you commit any.

Expunge your DUI record "completely" with the help of DUI Process Manual. It offers little-known strategies to clear your DUI record completely and pass employment background checks in a step-by-step approach. Visit my site for free DUI strategies report and DUI Process Manual review and take action to clear DUI record [].
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Thursday, May 15, 2014

Top 10 Reasons For Criminal Record Expungement

If you're one of the millions of Americans with a criminal record, you've likely experienced a few hardships as a result. There are countless difficulties that can arise if your background isn't spotless and most of those affected have yet to realize the scale of their disabilities. Below are the top ten reasons to apply for expungement of your criminal record. Expungement can relieve the burden and restore hope that has faded with the "life sentence" that can come with mistakes made long ago.

1. Employment

- Employers often deny jobs to applicants with a criminal background.

- Some states even allow employers to terminate current employees if they are found to have had a conviction

2. Education

- The Higher Education Act of 1998 makes students convicted of drug related offenses ineligible for any grant, loan or work assistance.

- Having a criminal record may prevent you from attending the college of your choice or disqualify you from certain graduate programs

3. Housing

- Private landlords can legally deny housing to someone with convictions.

4. Loans

- Having a criminal record may make you ineligible for a loan or result in higher interest rates

- Certain offenses can eliminate the possibility of a student receiving financial aid

5. Licensing & Certifications

- Convictions can prevent you from obtaining state licenses and certifications.

- Over half the states in the U.S. have no standards governing the relevance of an applicant's conviction records for occupational licenses.

6. Insurance Rates
- High insurance premiums may result if a criminal background is found.

- Specific offenses may deem you "uninsurable" or "high risk."

7. Firearm Rights
- Hunting rights may be limited to archery or muzzle loaders.

- Convictions can greatly restrict gun ownership.

8. Federal Assistance
- Several states ban people with convictions from being eligible for federally funded public assistance and food stamps.

- Many public housing authorities deny eligibility for federally assisted housing based on an arrest that never led to a conviction.

9. Adoption
- Fifteen states ban people with a criminal background from becoming an adoptive or foster parent.

10. Volunteering
- Nearly all volunteer positions involving youth require a clean criminal history.

Check your criminal record expungement [] eligibility for Free at [] You may reprint this article free of charge in your newsletter, magazine, or on your website, provided the article is unedited and that the author's information appears with each article. Articles appearing on the web must provide an active hyperlink to the author's web site,
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Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Pros and Cons to Consider When You Form a Limited Liability Company

A Limited Liability Company (LLC) is one of the newest types of business organization structure that combines the characteristics of other business types. It is often referred to as the hybrid of sole proprietorship, partnership, and corporation. Due to its newness, there may be various issues that can arise when businesses in form a LLC.

When a business decides to form a LLC, its pros and cons should be considered first. This is to ensure that the owner understand what the implications this move brings. The organizational structure of the company as well as its operational processes would definitely be affected by this choice of business type.

Consider these factors when putting up a LLC:


A LLC is very famous for its flexibility. With this type of structure, one member or more can establish the business easily. It can be formed online, at the office, or at home. Also, this allows full management or control of the business with an operating agreement made by the owner and other members.The free control over the operating agreement enables the company to establish its own rules and protective provisions for all its members.

Another benefit when a business chooses to form a LLC is the informal or less complicated business process. Unlike a corporation, a LLC can operate in an informal manner. This spares the members from attending annual meetings. Also, certain documentation are not strictly required. However, it is still advisable to keep records of business transactions for audit purposes or for any other future need.

Protection of assets is one of the most important advantages of a LLC. In this type of business, the owners of the company are not individually liable for any of the company's financial obligations. Passed through taxation is also automatic and therefore lessens the amount of taxes paid by the company.


Businesses that opt to form LLC may also face some limitations. Even if this business type is very flexible, there are also restrictions to its membership and operation. First, if the LLC reaches more than 20 members, there is a definite need for a manager. A manager is needed to oversee the progress of the business and to keep it organized. Hiring a manager for the LLC presents additional expenses to the business. Also, the LLC may be dissolved if one member quits. However, there are provisions in the state laws which can address this problem.

The LLC can also restrict the flow of the business profits and stocks. The LLC is not authorized to split the overall profit and loss to its members. Aside from that, raising capital in a limited liability business is difficult. This limitation results in the investors' preference for a corporation instead of a LLC. Additionally, the members cannot sell and issue stock certificates.

Lastly, the LLC may pose some fee and taxation issues. This involves payment of taxes for the limited liability benefit of a LLC business. Also, the annual fee of LLC in some states is higher compared to other structures of business.

If you are looking for information on Tennessee limited liability company, click on the link. Or you can visit
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Tuesday, May 13, 2014

What is an Advanced Directive?

It is not mandatory to have an advanced directive. No one can force you to prepare one.

There are two types of advance directives - living wills and durable power of attorney for health care.

Living wills are a legal document that you prepare to make your wishes known regarding health care issues and specifically end of life issues. They are implemented when you can no longer make decisions on your own.

A durable power of attorney for health care is when you appoint someone (a spouse, parent, sibling, friend, etc.) to make decisions (relating to health care) when you can no longer make decisions for yourself.

The person you appoint to make decisions for you is your "patient advocate". Your patient advocate can be any competent person over the age of 18. Before you appoint someone to be your advocate you should ask if they are willing to serve in this capacity.

Being a patient advocate is a very great responsibility. They will be able to make decisions for you concerning all medical treatments (and the right to refuse medical treatments on your behalf). They can also make decisions related to donation of your organs after you die.

It is important to appoint a back up person should your original appointee be unable or unwilling to make your decisions should the time come.

It is not necessary to use a lawyer to prepare either of these documents, but to be legal they must be witnessed by persons other than your relatives (spouses or heirs).

Once prepared you should make several copies. You should give a copy to your physician (or other health care provider). And should you be admitted to the hospital, you should take a copy with you. This is one document that should not keep secret.

Can I Change My Mind?

Yes, you certainly can. It is simply a matter of tearing up the document and notifying anyone that has a copy to tear it up.

You can prepare a new living will or durable power of attorney for health care at any time.

Who Should Prepare An Advanced Directive?

Everyone. No one can tell when a major life upset will occur. Everyone should have these documents prepared.

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Monday, May 12, 2014

What Is the Difference Between a Living Trust and a Life Estate in Real Estate Investing?

Both a living trust and a life trust are legal documents that are designed to facilitate financial planning for a homeowner. They are also both designed to aid in the seamless transfer of a property after the death of a beneficiary of these trusts.

A living trust is a document that is designed to avoid probate and allow the beneficiary(s) to control the destiny of the assets in the trust even after the death of the beneficiary. Essentially, the beneficiary, who is usually also the trustee, can determine the distribution of the assets or their liquidation and the proceeds distributed figuratively from the "grave".

By avoiding probate, the beneficiary can save a lot of money and probate battles between wannabe heirs. These probates can be very lengthy and even take many years to resolve. Between estate taxes and attorneys' fees, many estates lose 30% - 60% of their value before the liquidated assets are disbursed to the proper heirs as determined by the court.

Possibly more important to the beneficiaries of these living trusts, is the assets of the trust are not shown in the public record as with simple probated wills. The trust must pay income taxes and estates taxes and the trust does not save the beneficiaries any money in these areas.

Finally, in the event the trustee (beneficiary) is incapacitated, the trust contains language so a new trustee can be installed without a court order and this new trustee can take appropriate action with regard to the medical condition of a beneficiary. This avoids having to get a court order for a medical procedure which could take so long that the patient could die - or live an unreasonable time.

The life estate is also a legal document that is actually a special deed to a property that titles the property in such a manner that when the owner of the property dies, the additionally named individual on the deed automatically becomes the new owner as soon as the former primary owner's death certificate is filed in the public record. This instrument also bypasses the probate process but does not avoid any Federal estate taxes due.

The difference in the living trusts and the life estate is that the living trust is a document that contains specific instructions for a trustee in the manner and disbursement of many assets owned by the beneficiary of the trust. The property remains in the trust with a different trustee until the terms of the trust instrument are carried out by the trustee.

The life state is simply a special deed that conveys a single property from a primary owner to a second person when the primary owner is deceased and the death certificate is filed in the Clerk of the Court's public records. Both instruments bypass the probate process.

Dave Dinkel has over 40 years experience in Real Estate Investing which has given him a unique perspective into the Real Estate Market. Learn the "No Money, No Credit, No Risk" proven methods of today's successful Real Estate Investors. Visit America's Online Real Estate Investing Association created by Dave Dinkel to get you started as a Real Estate Investor today! Click the link Now
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Sunday, May 11, 2014

Incorporation - Is It Right For My Business?

The process to form your incorporation is relatively easy, and the legal concept of incorporation is recognized all over the world. A Certificate of Incorporation is the evidence of incorporation and registration of the legal entity with the authorities of a particular state or an offshore jurisdiction. A primary advantage of incorporation is the limited liability the corporate entity affords its shareholders, and in many cases, favorable tax treatment. For anyone starting up his or her own business, an understanding of business incorporation is a must before taking that step.

Incorporation is a system of registration which gives a business certain legal advantages in return for accepting specific legal responsibilities and is an option that many businesses each year decide to take advantage of. However, prior to filing with the state, you should have your attorney and accountant advise you as to whether or not incorporation is the right step for your business, both from a legal standpoint and from a tax perspective. If the corporation is a closely held corporation and does business primarily within a single state, local incorporation is usually preferable. Incorporation is a state process, and therefore the process and specific benefits may differ from state to state, as well as registration costs, resident agent fees, etc.

What type of incorporation is best for my business? A "C" Corporation, an "S" Corporation or a Limited Liability Company (LLC)? In addition to those choices, you then need to decide where to incorporate. Not only does each state offer certain benefits, but costs to file and maintain the corporate status are different. Additionally, if your business purpose is rather simple and straight forward, you may be able to use an online incorporation service to incorporate, at substantial savings. Remember, when in doubt, or if any questions or issues need addressed, seek professional usually is cheaper in the long run!

There are certain states that offer important incorporation benefits to the directors and shareholders. You need to make a comparison of these benefits, as well as the filing costs, to determine if incorporation in that state is warranted. Another consideration for incorporation in a state other than where your business is located, is that you may be required to register as a foreign corporation in your resident state. This will usually entail annual filing fees equal to or greater than that for a domestic corporation. Again, prepare a checklist and weigh all benefits as well as additional costs, etc. before the incorporation process begins. Rather than incorporating in another state, you may also benefit by an offshore incorporation. Check it out carefully.

Gust A. Lenglet is an accomplished author and financial advisor and has written many articles in the fields of investments, law, education, as well as taxation. He is President and CEO of HBS Financial Group, Ltd. and offers online tax filing as well as timely advice on tax planning and investments.
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Saturday, May 10, 2014

Can Someone Sign My Living Will For Me?

This is a situation that is more commonplace than expected. As we get older, it is increasingly difficult to write anything, including our own name. We know exactly how to do it, but our hands don't want to cooperate.

Unfortunately, we have to keep writing even in old age. There are bills to pay, checks to sign, applications to make, and a wide variety of other documents. Even worse, or signature changes over time. If you have a bank that is good with customer service, they can know these differences, and is best to update your signature cards every year or--they then know it is you signing the checks.

The signature can become be jerky or illegible. As such, is not uncommon for an adult child to take over as far as signing checks, contracts, credit cards, and alike. Here are some rules to be followed in such cases.

Having someone sign for you.

This is can be done if the testator (person signing the will) cannot otherwise sign. This is usually because of infirmity of age. As stated above, this is typically done by an adult child. There is no requirement of having signed for your parents before, although that certainly helps.

The key is the testator must clearly direct the other person to sign. There can be absolutely no doubt in this situation.

Many states have amended their probate codes to make this available. There must be an express and clear direction by the testator to have this done. Further, the signing must be in the "conscious presence" of the testator. This typically means in the physical proximity of the testator, who can readily be aware the signature is being placed on the paper. But, this does not mean it has to be in the testator's direct line of sight.

Example: Joy has been relying upon her daughter for some time to sign paperwork. On the occasion of her signing the will, Joy was sitting upright in bed, but has trouble moving her head from side to side. It would have been easy for her to turn completely to the left and see the signing on a table nearby, but this was not possible. So, with the table as close to the bed as possible, the daughter instructed her mother that she was now signing it. Her mother could not see the actual signing. But her mother could easily hear and understand what was going on. This will be sufficient.

The bottom line: make sure there is express authorization from the testator and at least two witnesses in attendance. And the right living will form to confirm all of this.

Sue Malone is the founder of, the Internet's premiere site for attorney-prepared online legal forms (providing do-it-yourself documents for over 25 years). All documents are fully editable, come with free updates for life, reasonably priced (starting at $25), and have an unlimited license for their use. Call for a free consultation--all reps have a law degree. (800) 995-9434. Or visit: [].
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Friday, May 9, 2014

Probate and Administrative Process, Know Your Rights

Probate is the system in which the court's system's method of processing the estates of a dead person. It is a legal document that enables the administration of the estate of the deceased. It allows for the resolving of claims and distribution of the deceased's will. Any grievances surrounding a deceased person's estate are filed in the probate court also known as the surrogate court. Once probated, the will becomes a legal instrument that can be enforced by the executor.

Administration process

Administration process of an estate on the other hand is the process by which the deceased person's assets are collected, maintained and distributed. An estate administrator sees to the proper administration of the will.

The Probate process

The probate process begins after the death of a person. An interested person files an application to administer the estate; a fiduciary is then appointed who is to administer the estate and at times may be required to pay a bond to safeguard and to insure the estate. Creditors are notified and legal notices published. There may be filed a petition to appoint a personal representative may need to be filed and letters of administration obtained. All these processes must be done in accordance with the limitation clause.

Property that avoids probate

Property that passes to another person contractually upon the death of a person does not enter probate for example a jointly owned property with rights of survivorship. Property held in a revocable or irrevocable trust that was created when the grantor's was still alive does not also enter probate. In most of these cases the property is distributed privately and without many issues thus no court action is required.

What happens in the probate and administrative process?

After a probate case has been filed in court, an inventory is entered and the deceased's property collected. The debts and taxes are paid first then the remaining property distributed to the beneficiaries. The probate and administrative process may be challenged at any time as a whole or part of it. The issues that arise during such hearings include will contests and paternity issues and these have to be solved before the matter is decided.

The need for the appointment of an administrator arises where the deceased left no will, some assets are not disposed of by the will, in cases where there is a will however, the case goes to probate directly. The estate administrators act like will executors but where the will does not state how to distribute of property, they follow the laid down laws.

Visit the Law Offices Roman Aminov Brooklyn to learn more on Probate Attorney Brooklyn law processes.
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Thursday, May 8, 2014

What Is Probate Law and How Does It Affect You Today?

Have you made your will official yet? It is not pleasant to talk about, but death will inevitably take us all at some point in our lives. Having an officially recognized will ensures that your estate goes to the people that you want it to when you pass away. The simplest definition of probate is 'the official proving of a will'. The laws of probate can be overwhelming at times, especially when emotions are still raw. It does serve its purpose however as not having a will (in-estate) makes the procedures a lot trickier and the results which can take months may not be what stakeholders deem right.

When a will is filed with the courts, the process for probate varies from country to country, even city to city. However the basic process is someone close to the deceased approaches the courts to act as 'executor', once the executor is established the process starts by collecting all assets and getting a value for the total. Once debts have been paid, the remaining assets can be distributed as per the will before the probate process is formally closed.

The Executioner

The executioner is usually the closest person to the deceased (wife, daughter, father etc.) or a close friend.

Probate affects you today in two ways. As someone who files a will and as a person nominated to be the executioner of a will.

Writing Your Will

Writing a will may seem like a death wish, it is something no one wants to ever think about however there is an incentive. You likely have worked hard for what you have acquired in life and would like your estate to be distributed as you see fit according to your values and wishes. It is also to protect your family, pre nuptial agreements may appear to only be agreed to when a high profile celebrity gets married, or someone wealthy but they are doing it for the same reasons as a will. The subject of money makes people act in irrational ways to protect themselves. Family members may lay claim that they should get everything, while others believe it should be theirs. It is not a nice situation for all involved. By writing your will now, you ensure that these disagreements can be solved by simply reading your official legal will.

As The Executioner

As the writer of the will, you will normally want to tell the person who you are leaving in charge of your estate should tragedy strike. It isn't the easiest conversation to begin, but knowing you have someone you trust can put your mind at ease. When someone brings up the subject with you, there is no set way to react. Simply listening to their requests is best, do not try and influence them either way. If you are unsure of anything though, do ask. Documenting everything possible is the safest option as emotions may get in the way of what was truly requested. In a perfect world there will be many, many years to you put everything in place exactly the way you wish. Make it a common practice to revisit the will every couple of years, to verify that it fits how you feel at that time.

Probate is something most people will deal with from both sides as the executioner and the writer of the will in their lifetime. Having a will ready so that the probate law process can be handled appropriately by all parties is law that should be taken seriously.
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Wednesday, May 7, 2014

7 Important Reasons to Form a Corporation or LLC for Your Business

Are you operating your business as a real business or as a hobby? It's time to make your business OFFICIAL before the summer push for business!

Let me ask you two important questions:

  1. Are you operating your business under your own name, a DBA or fictitious firm name, basically as a sole proprietorship or maybe as a general partnership? AND/OR
  2. Are you or your family at risk because of business or personal assets that are unprotected from unexpected losses or legal issues?

If you answered YES to either question please read on for important news about why NOW is the time to form an corporation or LLC for your business.

  1. Make it Official. Operating as a sole proprietorship or general partnership sends a message that you are still "testing" your business, or that you're not sure you'll really make it. Perhaps your accountant told you that incorporating is an unnecessary expense or that it won't help you save on taxes due to an expectation of low profits. This is the WORST marketing message you can send when you want to attract new clients and partners to your business, who want assurance that you're about your business and here to stay.

  2. The Law of Attraction. You get what you focus on. Testing, hoping and "seeing if things work out or not" BEFORE you decide to step-up and make your business official by incorporating broadcasts a clear message to the universe that you're not really serious about your business or committed to a positive outcome. The Law of Attraction states that the universe returns not what you wish for, but what you program into your deepest belief system through your dominant thoughts, actions and feelings. Making your business official and really stepping up says, "I am ready to receive!".

  3. Limited Personal Liability. You may be thinking "I already lost everything in the market collapse from 2008" and still recovering. If you're one of the few that managed to survive and grow your assets since then, but are still holding them in your own name, you're playing a VERY RISKY game (similar to those with assets in unstable European banks). Even if you don't have any assets right now, a lawsuit or judgment will destroy any credit you are looking to build in the future PLUS you may be looking over your shoulder for years waiting for someone to come after you when you finally do start to turn things around. That's no way to live your life. One lawsuit from an unprotected business can ruin your chances of getting a personal auto loan or refinancing your home. Good people who "play by the rules" can still be sued for the most unexpected reasons. You may be thinking "my business insurance will help me out" but are you really covered? Even if your business is never sued, what if you're unable to pay a vendor and they come after you? Do you want to be personally liable? Put a halt to greedy people looking to take what you have worked for! This is the best time to form an LLC or corporation to limit your personal liability.

  4. Reduce Your Taxes. The bottom line is that operating as a sole proprietorship will cost you the most in employment taxes (up to 15.3% on earned income up to $113,700 in 2013). That means that your income will be taxed as the HIGHEST possible TAX RATE as a sole proprietorship. By the way, filing a Schedule C (the form filed for earned income from a sole proprietorship) also means that your business is among those MOST LIKELY TO BE AUDITED. Why? The IRS has a $300 BILLION tax gap and they believe the biggest tax cheats are the little business owner like you. Why? Their stats show them that sole proprietorship are MOST likely to UNDER report their income and OVER report their expenses (two big no-no's with the IRS). Operating as an S corporation or LLC taxed as an S corporation in many situations is a much better approach for two reasons. You will have part of your profits as distributions which are NOT subject to the 15.3% employment taxes AND move that profit to schedule E, not schedule C which is more likely to be audited!

  5. Access More Funding Options. Operating as a sole proprietorship or general partnership limits you when it comes to funding options. You are also DAMAGING YOUR PERSONAL CREDIT SCORE by operating this way. How do you finance your business as a sole proprietorship? You use your PERSONAL CREDIT cards which will drive up your revolving debt which will in turn DRIVE DOWN your personal credit score! When you form a corporation or an LLC you will SEPARATE your PERSONAL and BUSINESS CREDIT. Yes, any type of cash funding with a personal guarantee will come into play, but that DEBT does NOT show up in the personal credit bureau which is HUGE for future funding! As you form a new LLC or corporation NCP will help (if you choose) to build your business credit scores quickly and get your business in a position to secure funding to grow. But the first step is to form a separate legal entity.

  6. Simply Your Life. Yes, in fact operating as a sole proprietorship will complicate your life, not the opposite. Separating your business and personal life will make it much easier for you to navigate both from a financial and legal point of view. Now you will have each in its own compartment where it belongs to protect your overall success.

  7. Asset Protection. Forming an LLC for your safe assets like investments (those outside a retirement plan) will help you sleep better at night knowing you don't have all your "eggs" in one basket. If you are using a LIVING TRUST to protect your assets that will NOT work and everything in your trust may be vulnerable. Do you own other businesses that really should be operating through a separate bank account in a separate entity? Do you own real estate in your own name that may be sending a message that you are rich and have assets worth taking? Have you been in business for years or are you operating more than one business in one entity? Are you doing some business with a new partner and making the big mistake of running that revenue through your current business? Avoid these costly mistakes and form a separate company for that separate business.

Do you need support in forming a corporation or LLC? Not sure what entity or state is best? Call Nevada Corporate Planners, Inc. at 1-888-627-7007, the company I founded. We incorporate in all 50 states and have amazing support and turn key packages to help you also with building business credit and helping keep the IRS off your back!
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Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) vs. Living Will

Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order covers two types of emergencies: when your heart stops beat or you stop breathing. Living wills covers almost all types of life-prolonging treatments and procedures.

Monday, May 5, 2014

How To File For Divorce

If you and your spouse have an "amicable divorce" and do not have any children, filing for divorce shouldn't be very difficult.. In these cases, you can probably file jointly for a simplified divorce. In more complex cases, however, you usually have to petition the court for your divorce and serve your ex with a copy of the court papers.

Sunday, May 4, 2014

What Does LLC Stand For?

Many ask the question of What Does LLC Stand For? They are usually looking for one of two answers: (i) what do the actual letters stand for and where did it come about; or (ii) what benefits and features does an LLC provide?

LLC Stands for Limited Liability Company

The LLC is a creature of state laws. In 1977, Wyoming was the first state to enact a law that gave birth to a limited liability company. Since then, every state in the United States has passed a set of laws which allow for a legal entity called a limited liability company to be created under the law.

The main reason the LLC was born is because small business owners needed a legal entity that was more catered form them as compared to the corporation entity which was more suitable for larger businesses.

Lawmakers want to encourage small business as it drives our economy and creates jobs. Accordingly, what the LLC provides is a legal entity which provides benefits that are specifically tailored for the small business owner but also has the flexibility to accommodate larger businesses as well.


The LLC provides business owners with a shield of protection. Owners are not personally liable for the debts and obligations of the business. In addition, this type of legal entity offers a single layer of taxation which minimizes taxes for owners and even allows active members to take a deduction against other income if the business generates losses.

The benefits do not end with protection and taxes. The limited liability company also allows flexibility for business owners to tailor who they want their business to operate and be managed. You are not forced to fit into a one size fits all governance structure.

Business owners want to spend their time building their business and not maintaining legal entities or having to keep up with legal compliance requirements. LLC laws were specifically designed to make the use of this vehicle easy. There are minimal requirements to form and maintain a limited liability company.

Another benefit is that the use of a legal entity for a business conveys a more professional and official image. Customers see that the business is a limited liability company and know that the owners of the business engaged in some serious business planning. This is great for getting more business.

So, when one asks what does LLC stand for, the answer is that it stands for the most popular legal entity vehicle for small business. For the low cost to form one, a business owner gets tremendous benefits and advantages.

For a FREE LLC GUIDE and to learn more about the Limited Liability Company, visit The Learning Center and our comprehensive LLC KnowledgeBase at
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Thursday, May 1, 2014

What Is Health Care Power of Attorney?

A health care power of attorney or a health care proxy is a document that designates a person or persons you name and authorizes that person to make health care decisions for you -- but only in circumstances when you can't make the decisions for yourself.