Sunday, August 31, 2014

Living Trust Definition - What is a Living Trust?

The best living trust definition is a written legal document which substitutes for a will as your primary estate planning vehicle. When you have a trust you transfer your assets such as your home, financial accounts and personal property to the trust. In addition you change the beneficiary or contingent beneficiary of retirement accounts and life insurance to the trust. These assets are then administered for your benefit during your lifetime, and either continue to be held or transferred to your beneficiaries when you die.

The creator, also called the grantor, of the trust usually names him or herself as the initial trustee in charge of managing the assets. This allows the grantor to remain in control of the assets during his or her lifetime. For all practical purposes under this living trust definition, nothing changes in the way the grantor manages or controls the assets after they are put in trust. The only difference is the named owner.

A successor trustee is named in the document, usually a family member or friend but sometimes an institution such as a bank or trust company. This successor trustee then will manage the trust assets for benefit of the grantor if the grantor becomes disabled and for the contingent beneficiaries after the grantor dies.

This living trust definition is for the revocable living trust. It is also sometimes referred to as a revocable inter vivos or a grantor trust. It may be revoked or amended at any time by the grantors as long as they are still competent.

Robert Olson is the lead attorney at DIY Lawyer []. A website dedicated to helping people do their own legal work including drafting a Living Trust. They offer an e-book with a money back guarantee titled the Living Trust Annotated. This book teaches you to draft your own Living Trust for a fraction of what you would pay an attorney. With the purchase of the e-book you also receive a free half hour phone consultation with a DIY Lawyer to answer your questions about the book. You can read about it at DIY Lawyer's Living Trust Annotated [].
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Saturday, August 30, 2014

The Advantages of Incorporation

It is a universal fact that persistent hard work and some timely luck is needed to be successful in any business venture. However, when it comes to forming a corporate entity for your business, a little homework is all that is required to help make an informed decision which could lead to the continued success of your business.

While it is correct for business owners to give premeditated thought as to their venture's location, customer service, human resources and other management issues, it is equally important that the owner consider the corporate structure of the business as well.

Many business owners don't consider this, but the corporate structure that is chosen can often times be the difference between the venture's success or failure, especially in today's highly competitive and litigious marketplace. Most often, entrepreneurs select the corporation as their preferred entity choice, which encompasses several unique benefits.

Incorporating, while definitely not for everybody, offers several distinct and money-saving advantages over other types of legal entities. Here are eight advantages of incorporation:

1. Protection of Personal Assets
If you operate as a sole proprietor or partnership, there is virtually unlimited personal liability for business debts or lawsuits. In other words, should you go out of business or be a defendant in a lawsuit, your personal assets such as homes, jewelry, vehicles, savings, etc. are subject to seizure. This is generally NOT the case of incorporation. When you incorporate you are only responsible for your initial investment in the corporation; as such, this limited liability feature of a corporation, while not a guarantee, is DEFINITELY one of the most attractive reasons of incorporation.

2. Transferable Ownership
Corporations are generally much easier to sell and are usually more attractive to buyers than either a sole proprietorship or partnership. The reason for this is because a new buyer will not be personally liable for any wrongful acts committed by the previous owners. For example, if someone buys a sole proprietorship, the new owner can be held personally liable for any mistakes or illegalities on the part of the prior owner... even if the new owner had NOTHING to do with the situation! This is usually NOT the case with a corporation.

3. Taxation
When you incorporate a business, there are numerous tax advantages at your disposal that are virtually impossible to accomplish with other business entities. When a business is incorporated, a separate and distinct legal entity is created. Because of this, there are various transactions that can be structured within the corporate parameters of the business that will save big money on taxes. For instance, if you own a building, you can rent office facilities to your corporation and claim depreciation and other deductions for it. Your corporation can then claim the rental expense. You are prohibited from doing this if you are a sole proprietor or a partner in a partnership.

4. Privacy and Confidentiality
Incorporating your business is a great way to keep your identity and business affairs private and confidential. If you want to start a business, but would like to remain anonymous, forming a corporation is the best way to accomplish this. Moreover, some states such as Nevada offer even more privacy protection for corporations and their shareholders.

5. Easier to Raise Capital
When you're looking to raise money through investment or borrowing, a corporation can actually make finding and getting the money you need easier. If you want to take on investors, you simply sell shares of stock. If you want to borrow, a corporation can add clout when dealing with banks or other lending institutions.

6. Perpetuity
As mentioned in #3, when you incorporate a business, you create a separate and distinct legal entity. This separate and distinct entity (the corporation) will exist in perpetuity irrespective of what happens to the shareholders, directors, or officers. This is NOT the case with sole proprietorships, partnerships or even limited liability companies. For example, if an owner, partner, or member dies, the business AUTOMATICALLY ends or gets wrapped up in the legal dissolution process. Corporations, on the other hand, exist forever.

7. Retirement funds
Retirement funds and qualified retirement plans, such as a 401k, may be established more easily.

8. Credit Rating
Regardless of an owner's personal credit scores, a corporation can acquire its own credit rating, and build a separate credit history by applying for and using corporate credit.

Yusoff Allian is a legal expert on the formation of C-corporations, LLCs, and LLPs. To learn more about the advantages of incorporation, visit
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Friday, August 29, 2014

How to Choose an LLC Registered Agent

It is a must for your LLC to appoint a registered agent. That is because this person is responsible for sending and receiving documents on behalf of your company. And like any person you want to work with during the course of your business, you must choose your agent carefully.

Consider Your Capabilities and Resources

You can be your own LLC registered agent, but it's not advisable unless processing LLC papers is your specialty. Also, avoid choosing agents on the sole basis of fees; as the old saying goes, you get what you pay for. Don't forget to consult with the other LLC members during your search.

Gather Recommendations

Don't know where to start looking? Use your business network and ask for feedback from others who have experience hiring a LLC registered agent. Narrow down your recommendations to those who look like they suit your purposes. You should have three to five prospects on your "to interview" list by the time you're done with this step.

Visit your Agent's Physical Office

LLC registered agents who are worth their salt should have a website where you can learn everything there is to know about them. If you have spare time, though, it wouldn't hurt to pay your prospect a visit. That way, you'll get an idea how your agent operates based on the general "feel" of their office. For example, an agent with a messy, disorganized table is likely to treat business transactions the same way as well.

Ask Questions

Quiz your prospective agent on the process of organizing LLCs. A good one must be able to provide satisfactory answers regarding the theoretical and practical aspects of LLCs. Keep in mind that you'll never know when you'll need your agent's services, so inquire about operating hours and contact information as well.

Make Your Decision

All registered agents have their respective pros and cons. It's up to you to decide what strengths you need from your agent, and what weaknesses you can put up with. You can change your agent if you wish, but you'll have to contend with additional paperwork and fees.

Search for an agent the way employers screen employees: Let the right people know that you're searching, analyze your prospects carefully, and narrow your choices down to those who can gel with your LLC's culture. The steps outlined above are applicable not only for LLC registered agents, but also for other professionals you'll need aboard your boat too.

If you are looking for information on Tennessee LLC registered agent, click on the link. Or you can visit
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Thursday, August 28, 2014

Cover Your Bases With Estate Planning


Create a Will

As an original concept of estate planning, creating a will is a part of it. By writing a will, money and property are divided after someone's death. There is a living will, which relates to medical treatment and any procedures that must be adhered to in case the originator becomes extremely or deathly ill. Also, by taking responsibility for communicating--both properly and promptly--creates a more action oriented atmosphere that is destined to be organized, in comparison to no guidance for the future.

Issue Trusts

After someone's death, relatives and loved ones tend to be on end. In some cases, there are certain property rights and awards that must be issued out to these members. That is where a trust sets in. A trust is method of passing down funds to another, after one's death has occurred. There are many forms of a trust in action today; and they vary according to the specific needs of the person granting the initial trust (in most circumstances).

Power of Attorney

During estate planning, assigning a Power of Attorney is important. By addressing this issue, someone is nominated as the head honcho when you are not able. This applies to financial issues and personal matters (i.e. health).

Letter of Instruction

Moreover, a letter of instruction is another important document that must be created and developed. This kind of particular pass-down includes specific directives that your successors must adhere. In summary, a letter of instruction contains contact information (in the event of your death), which pertains to where important information, files, or safes are stored; and details that pertain to financial accounts, in addition to pass-downs about continuing activities.

Good Reasons for Estate Planning

When the responsibilities--of a grantor, etc.--are put into place, the numbers can be big, in relation to financial responsibilities, health decision leader, etc. As a result, governments and certain laws have been put into place, in order to assist families and associates passing things down. Before, without a will or any other lawful documentation, people and tribes had to go by what they were told, and what they had learned, while certain individuals were alive and/or on their deathbeds. Thereafter, conflict could occur because of possible misrepresentation, disbelief, and manipulative factors.

With that said, by attempting to be responsible and producing wills and trusts (estate planning), detrimental misguidance--concerning responsibilities--should be null if any. Ultimately, It is always a good idea to tinker with estate planning; cover your bases, before you are out for the count.

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Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Estate Planning Eases Confusion, Financial Worries

What you need to know about estate planning, including why having a will and assigning a power of attorney is crucial.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Monday, August 25, 2014

Jeffrey Volosin Discusses The Difference Between LLC And C Corps for Businesses

As being a part of the business world, it is important to understand different terms. Educating oneself on these terms not only helps with learning and understanding business conversation, but lets people know that the businessman (or woman) is serious and truly knowledgeable in the field. The two terms professionals should be able to know are a limited liability company (LLC) and a C corporation. While they are both structures, they both have their different traits and can allow many businessmen and businesswomen know what is most suitable for a business. Both have an indefinite term of life, but LLCs having plenty of distinguishing traits.

A limited liability company (better known as an LLC) is a specific type of business entity that mixes the personal liability protection of a corporation with the tax benefits of a partnership. It is a structure that offers protection to a company's owner. An LLC is best suited for small businesses with very few shareholders.

A limited liability company's taxation is a single taxation, which means the interests of the profit or loss is passed to members who are in the top 39.6% bracket. An LLC has the option to elect to be taxed as a corporation. Only the members own and manage an LLC. It has limited liability. In other words, the liability is not exceeded by the amount invested by members. Meetings for members are not required, but activities should be recorded.

A C corporation is a complete opposite. It is a specific type of business entity that is taxed separate from its owners. It is used for medium and large-sized corporations and owned by its shareholders; this is different from an LLC since LLCs deal with small businesses with a few shareholders. C corporations are managed by officers while LLCs are managed by the members or managing members themselves.

Another trait of C corporations is that it uses a double taxation in lieu of a single taxation that is seen in LLCs. Income is taxed roughly 34% and shareholders pay taxes on profits distributed. The choice of taxation structures are not allowed with C corporations, they must be taxed at a corporate tax rate. Shareholders are required to attend board meetings whereas stated for LLCs, meetings are not required. While these differences may be broad between the two types of corporate structures, knowing the differences allows professionals to make the right assessments for future businesses.

If you are looking for more information on incorporating your small business, please visit to get find out more.
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Thursday, August 21, 2014

Understanding the Difference Between a Will and a Living Trust

When planning for the future of your children as you get older, there are a few options on how to pass on your assets such as property, life insurance, stocks, etc. The two major ways of stating and distributing your assets after your passing is with a living trust or will. When you hear the words trust fund or wills, it refers to estate planning. Although there are different trusts out there, the main one I will focus on is a living trust.


A will is a document that is created to help distribute assets and properties to a beneficiary after one passes away. With a will, it will be submitted through a probate process, which is a court process. In this process, the courts will validate the will and ensure that all the instructions are followed properly while also repaying any creditors. The downfall to a will is that it becomes public so anyone can see the distribution of your assets to your selected beneficiaries. On top of not having privacy, it could take several months to even years for the court to sort everything out!

Living Trust

A living trust is a legal document that states three parties: Grantor/Trustor, Trustee, and Beneficiaries. The grantor/trustor is the individual or couple who establishes/creates the trust. The trustee is the person nominated to be in control of the trusts assets. In many cases, the trustee is the same as the grantor/trustor. Beneficiaries are those at the receiving end who will benefit from the trust. A trust is beneficial to most people who have property worth $100,000+ and/or those who have large amounts of assets. In certain states, properties at $100,000+ can be subject to legal fees in the probate process. With a living trust, it bypasses the whole probate process and all assets can be immediately accessed by the beneficiaries. As opposed to a will, a living trust is private so it does not go through a probate process, therefore it is NOT a public record. Things that can be listed in a living trust include: stocks, bonds, real estate, life insurance, personal property, etc.

A trust is beneficial for estate planning for those who have large amounts of assets. By establishing a specific living trust known as an A-B Trust, an individual can reduce the amount of taxes paid significantly. For example, in 2012, the current estate tax is $5.12M with a cap at 35% over the $5.12M. In an A-B Trust with a couple passing their assets to their one kid, they would designate half the fund to the surviving spouse and the other half to the kid. The surviving spouse and the kid will then each receive a tax break of $5.12M giving a sheltered total of $10.24M from estate taxes. When the surviving spouse passes, then his/her half is giving to the kid who is then subject to another $5.12M tax break. Unlike a trust, a will however will be only have a tax break of $5.12M.


When comparing the differences of having a last will versus a living trust, it shows that the trust comes out on top. A trust will help to give privacy, immediate access to assets from beneficiaries, AND tax breaks. For those who are near the age of deciding what to pass on to their children or know someone in that situation, help them understand the difference of the two and sway them toward a living trust if feasible!

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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Updating Your Will - There May Be More Reasons to Do So Than You Realize

Your Last Will and Testament is your only chance to decide what happens to your estate assets upon your death. It is the cornerstone of your estate plan -- the document from which all other estate planning tools flow. Once you have taken the time and effort to create your Will, don't make the mistake of failing to update it when necessary. Some reasons that a Will needs to be updated are obvious; however, consider the following, not so obvious, reasons as well when deciding if it's time to take another look at your Will.

Death: People think to update a Will when a parent, spouse or child dies, but the death of the person named as executor or guardian of your minor children can also prompt a review of your Will. The death of a business partner or even an in-law may also warrant a Will update.

Marriage or Divorce: Clearly, your own marriage or divorce calls for a revision of your Will; however, other marriages or divorces may also necessitate a change. The marriage or divorce of a parent, child or guardian, for example, can call for a review of your Will.

Birth: Although it is easy to rely on a generic term, such as "issue", to cover all of your children or grandchildren, it may be preferable to name each beneficiary by name in your Will to avoid any possible future confusion. As such, take the time to update your Will when there is a birth in the family.

Beneficiary Reaches the Age of Majority: Minors cannot inherit directly in your Will. As such, you likely named a trustee for any minor children when you made your Will. If a child has reached the age of majority, you will need to remove the trustee and provide for the direct transfer of those assets to the beneficiary in your Will.

Change in Assets: Although you may have a general provision in your Will for any asset not specifically named, if you acquire an asset worth a significant amount of money, or sell one, you may need to update your Will to address that asset for clarification.

Change in Location: In the confusion of a move, people typically don't think of how residency can affect a Will. State laws, however, can directly impact provisions in your Will, warranting a review and possible revision.

Change in State or Federal Laws: Laws change on a regular basis. Federal tax laws, for example, seem to continuously change. A significant change in either a state or federal law can result in the need to make a corresponding change to your Will.

You Reach the Age of Required Distributions: IRAs and 401(k)s typically require you to start taking distributions around the age of retirement. If you have significant funds in one of these accounts, the required distributions can change your asset structure enough to warrant a Will update.

Change in Guardian: This is a big, yet often forgotten, reason to update your Will. Regardless of the reason why you wish to change the named guardian for your minor children, if you wish to do so you must make it official by revising your Will.

Experienced estate planning attorneys Atlanta GA of the Pyke & Associates P.C. offers estate planning and business planning resources to residents of Atlanta GA. To learn more about these free resources, please visit today.
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Sunday, August 17, 2014

Understanding Probate in California

Probate is the legal process that settles the property of the deceased person and tells how it should be equally distributed among the heirs and beneficiaries in case there is no will. The rules and regulations of probate vary form state to state and each state can have a different procedure and hearing process for probate. Some general guidance might be similar in most states but it is always advised to take help of a legal advisor in case you need to understand the probate process in your locality. Moreover you should understand that every probate case is different depending on the amount of money involved in it. The different property, debts and people involved in it make the whole case different from one other. There is no way that the rules and results of one probate case can apply to other case. Normally people have a view point that probate can be an ugly scene but the fact is that it can be easy if all parties involved in it work together for a positive outcome and preserve the memory of the deceased person.

In most cases, the property of the deceased person is transferred to his spouse if the person has not made any will before his expiry but in some conditions due to the parties' involved the property cannot be transferred to the spouse directly. The probate court which hears the matter of probate cases will get involved if there any issues relating to the property of the deceased person. The case has to go through a legal framework and the final order of the court has to be addressed by each person involved in the case. Now, since every state has different law regarding the probate so the hearings of the case in the court can be different in each state.

If the deceased person has a will and has named a representative,all the assets will be handled by this person unless the judge deems this person unfit, etc.If there is no representative named in the will then the court appoints a representative who handles the property unless the decision is made. The appointed representative is called the administrator and has sole responsibility of handling the property.

The Probate Process

In the initial phase the administrator opens the case in the court. During this period he evaluates the property and collects all the property of the deceased person. Few items which come under contract of the deceased person are not held in probate and they pass automatically to the beneficiary. Any bank accounts or other things which has the clause of "payable on death" are transferred to the person named in the contract. Only those limited property that have no clear beneficiaries are accountable for probate process. After accumulating all the property, the administrator sends a legal notice to all parties involved in the case and pays all the debts and claims which remain outstanding on the deceased name. Then the administrator distributes the remaining property to the beneficiaries of the decedent as instructed in the court's verdict.

If there are any disputes during the process then the court hearing decided upon the matter and the final verdict has to be agreed upon by every parties involved in the probate process. Anyone can file the claim on the property and if the court declines the claim then the opponent can file lawsuit to claim the property. If the lawsuit is made then court has to take the case more formally and this is when major problems occur during the probate process.

Normally, probate process take a longer time and if the amount involved is huge then the process can be more problematic. But if all the parties involved work together to make a positive solution then probate process can be competed easily and the property is distributed equally among the heirs or beneficiaries.

Luis Pezzini
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Saturday, August 16, 2014

What is Probate? Should Probate be Avoided?

- What is Probate?

- Should I try to avoid Probate with my Estate Plan?

- How can i avoid Probate?

Friday, August 15, 2014

Reasons Why Making a Will Is Important

Most people tend to procrastinate about making their last will and testament, primarily because it is a harsh reminder of our mortality and as such, we prefer not to have anything to do with it until the time comes when it is too late to do something about it. In most funerals you attend, you often hear people ask if the deceased left any will and the most common answer being "no" or "none."

While making a will is certainly no one's favorite thing to do, what many people don't realize is that it can alleviate your fears of death because once you decide to make it, you will be assured that the loved ones you leave behind will be taken care of properly and that your estate won't be spent on legal expenses from contests initiated by your heirs.

However, that's not to say you can't die without ever making a will. In fact, there are two ways by which you can die without a will, the first being because you never wrote one and the second being, the will you wrote was declared invalid by probate court. In both cases, this is referred to as dying intestate or dying without a valid will.

When you die intestate, that means the control of your property and the distribution of your assets will be done under the laws of intestacy. If for example you co-owned a property with two other people, the laws of intestacy dictate that the ownership will not transfer to the other co-owners but your heirs, which is one situation that the remaining co-owners may contest.

There are four types of assets where these laws don't apply and they are as follows:

  • Life insurance and retirement plan proceeds
  • Properties that are jointly owned with a right of survivorship
  • Properties held in a living trust
  • Properties under the community property system

The entire purpose of making a will is to make sure your property and assets are distributed to people and organizations as you intended. To make sure this happens you can elect an executor of your will to make sure every condition in your will is fulfilled. Choosing an executor means you should choose someone you trust like a relative or a close friend. If you don't have neither to choose from, then it should be someone who is dependable, trustworthy, well-organized, good with paperwork and diligent about meeting deadlines.

And lastly, making a will doesn't have to follow a strict guideline because what will matter is not how the will was written but the conditions written within. There are many ways these days to write your own will, such as software that you can use just by asking you a few questions where your answers will be inserted into a ready-made will. Having a will ready will also save you from having to hire a lawyer to help you write one - not only is it time-consuming to find a good lawyer, it is also quite expensive to have one draft your will for you.

When you want to learn more about how to avoid problems after you've gone, check out this post about will disputes so that your loved ones are well taken care of when it matters.
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Monday, August 11, 2014

The Advantages of Making a Will Which Can Serve As a Catalyst for Preparing It

Like most legal documents, the importance of a will increases with its acceptance amongst authorities. Making a Will is a complete legal procedure and its advantages are many which make the preparation imperative on the part of the owner. But the legal responsibility for making a Will shouldn't be taken in a negative light and procrastinated about. Instead the very advantages of making a Will could be the single greatest catalyst for the preparation of a Will by the owner of the assets. Below are a few of the major advantages of making a Will that could be the catalyst for the owner to prepare it.

Also we would like to state that people rarely find making a Will to be a pleasant task. Preparing a Will is a metaphor for our own mortality which people don't want to face. But as they say- No one is immortal or escapes death and taxes! Who knows? You could compromise with your own mortal end during the preparation and come out with a better view on life.

The advantages of making a Will are:

No dispute between dependents: There can be no chance of any conflict or dispute between the several dependents of the property if a will is already made. The will perfectly sums up what is left to whom and that itself diffuses any chance of conflict plus the division is also ensured by law of the land. Without a Will, inheritance disputes often run into years and decades which are not a viable option.

Lack of ambiguity: A Will is a legal document that clearly states the division of the property and that in itself clearly puts out the lack of ambiguity.

Property Management: The property can now be easily managed or divided according to the directions given in the Will and that leads to a better sense of property management.

Appointment of Executor/Guardian or Trustee: Will often appoints a responsible person as a Executor or a Trustee who acts as the overseer of the property. This also is important when the beneficiary is a minor or of unsound mind and cannot look after the assets.

Disclosure: All the property hidden or otherwise has to be correctly shown while making a Will. This procedure eliminates the chances of any secretive assets and the process will be highly beneficial to the beneficiaries of the How to make a will. offers easy, legal, affordable and online Will Writing solution - write a Will in just 30 minutes - no calls, no meetings, no advocates, etc..
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Sunday, August 10, 2014

Why Making a Will Is An Important Task for Your Family And You

All our lives we work hard to ensure that our family never has to face a difficult time ever but we promptly forget all about them at the end. We are talking about preparing wills or last testaments that people almost always don't prepare or unnecessarily delay due to a psychological block. The psychological block is our inherent fear of death which is aggravated during the making of a will. The preparation of a will is almost an indication of our own mortality and that is something none of us want to accept.

But whether we accept it or not, our mortality is the only truth and we must keep the responsibility of taking care of our family with us. A will could save our family from a host of troubles out of which some could be huge hassles that will need a lot of time and resources to solve. Say for example, the most common form of trouble that comes from the non preparation of a will is property disputes. Normal property disputes could siphon off huge amounts of time and resources. Plus there is no guarantee that the problem will be solved within a stipulated time. Property disputes are known to stretch for years and some even extend till the death of the supposed beneficiary. This means there are chances that your family might never get to enjoy the property that rightfully belongs to them.

Does that statement depress you? But that's simply the beginning as there will be more and more problems associated with non-existence of a will.

The next problem that could occur is the proper division of the property and in case of common ownership of a property- the lack of a trust fund. These are legal wrangles that could again put pressure on your family or dear one's resources.

Making a will is the best form of property management as the methods of division are expressly mentioned in the will. Without the existence of a will there are chances that the beneficiaries or dependents will have a tough fight in their hands to ensure their right on the property. Then there are properties which have common ownership and for those you need to create a trust fund. But that's again not possible without the presence of a will or testament.

Make a will immediately as this will not only guarantee the peace and security of your loved ones but also give you the strength to accept your own impending mortality.

Making a last will or testament is no easy task but Willjini can help you in doing so. How to make a will.
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Saturday, August 9, 2014

Should You Include Your Spouse When Forming a Small Business LLC?

In this video it talks about a couple of reasons why you may not want to have your spouse included in your LLC. But every situation is different.

Friday, August 8, 2014

How to Expunge a DUI Record

Getting behind the wheel while you are under the influence of alcohol or drugs is a very stupid decision. This mistake can cost you a hefty fine or your freedom. You can get arrested for drunk driving and this charge may result to expensive fines, community service, jail time and a permanent record.

A DUI conviction in your record can have a negative impact which may affect many areas of your life. Even after you have paid the fines, attended drunk driving classes, and served your sentence, you may realize that a DUI conviction on your record can become a form of punishment on its own. For instance, a permanent record can keep you from getting a job, a loan, or from renting a decent apartment. To that end, you may want to have your DUI record expunged.

What Is Expungement?

When the court agrees to expunge a criminal record, it basically means that the conviction is sealed or erased. To that end, when a background check is performed, the record won't appear. This is very helpful for those who are seeking employment, applying for a loan, or for other purposes.
Remember though that the record is not completely erased. It can still be seen by law enforcers and court officials to check whether the person has previous run-ins with the law. But an expungement will keep the permanent record from ruining the individual's life.

How To Expunge A DUI

1. Understand what it means to expunge a DUI record: As previously mentioned, DUI is a permanent record. If it gets expunged, all the information about the case, including the files, records, and criminal charges will be sealed. This means that in case you apply for a job, you can tell your potential employer that you have never been arrested, charged, or convicted of DUI.

2. Learn about the laws involving the expungement procedure: You need to understand that expungement process may vary from state to state. To that end, you must check with your country's court or law enforcement agency where the arrests are expunged. Ask about the requirements, such as a certificate that proves you have completed probation and how many years before you can get your DUI expunged. There are some states that allow immediate expungement for some cases, such as a first offense in DUI.

3. Complete the process: It is crucial to fill out all the necessary forms and requests for expungement, such as the Motion to Expunge. After filling out the formal request, you will need to submit the application to the court and pay the fees necessary. You must then attend the expungement hearing once it is scheduled by the court. Lastly, you may also need to appear in front of a judge.

If everything went well, the judge will agree to the expungement plea. He will then give a court order to expunge the DUI record.

The author of this post suggests her readers to look for credible Spokane expungement lawyers if they want their DUI record or other criminal record expunged.
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Thursday, August 7, 2014

LLC Or Corporation - Which is Best For My Business?

Both the LLC and corporation are legal entities that provide liability protection for their owners. While the corporation has been around longer, the limited liability company was created to offer the same level of protection. However, an LLC is designed specifically to cater toward the small business owner. It offers the same liability protection as a corporation but allows a much more simple operational structure with a lesser number of formalities.

LLC v. Corporation - TAX MATTERS

The limited liability company offers more tax choices than a corporation. Owners of an LLC can elect for profits to be taxed pursuant to a pass through structure (single layer of taxation) or pursuant to a C corporation (double taxation) or S corporation structure (single taxation but with many requirements and ongoing compliance requirements).

The corporation only has the choice of C corporation or S corporation taxation. Small business owners many times prefer the LLC pass through taxation because it allows them to avoid double taxation of profits and in many cases be able to take business losses to reduce taxes from other income WITHOUT having to worry about meeting a laundry list of S corporation requirements.

While the S corporation structure is available to both types of entities, it only allows a certain # of owners, all owners must be persons (so no entities) and US or permanent residents of the United States. There are other requirements as well so check with your accountant for the specific details.

As a business evolves, things change and with an S corporation tax status, you always need to be on top of the latest S corporation requirements. The failure to meet a requirement, even if accidental, can result in disastrous tax liability and penalties.

The S corporation can have some tax benefits over the standard pass through when it comes to self employment. In these cases, you have the option of S corporation taxation with either the LLC or corporation.


An LLC also gives an LLC business much more flexibility when it comes to ownership structure. The LLC laws allow for the company to tailor what each owner gets in terms of voting control and distributions.
 The corporation has a set ownership structure. Ownership is defined by a share of stock and each share of stock provides a set right when it comes to voting and profits rights. The LLC can choose this standard structure but does have the flexibility to customize it if needed without having to create multiple classes of ownership.

Accordingly, an LLC is more attractive when it comes to bringing in investment capital or services partners because it offers more options to address specific business situations.


In addition, a limited liability company can have a very simple single layer of management (known as member-managed) or the management structure can be structured with a central governing body (manager managed).

When it comes to operations, the LLC is not required to meet the same level of formalities and paperwork as a corporation.

The corporation laws generally impose a set management structure for a corporation which requires a Board of Directors as a central body of management. In addition, in most states, there are required meetings and certain governance documents that must be entered into each year.

While it is still recommended that an LLC have some simple governance paperwork to document major business decisions, it is comforting to know that the laws do not require it for the legal entity to qualify as an LLC and get LLC benefits.

In deciding LLC or corporation, the LLC offers the same management structure imposed upon for a standard corporation but also allows for a much simpler one or a more complex one if needed to protect investors or the business.


Given the simplicity and flexibility of the limited liability company, the LLC was designed to offer all the benefits of a corporation but without the disadvantages. As a result, the number of LLC formations each year greatly surpass incorporations when it comes to small businesses.

However, there are some situations where the corporation may be the better entity choice. If you plan on taking your business public with an initial public offering, you should use a corporation. Also, if your business requires professional company investors such as venture capitalists, the venture capitalists will generally require that your business be a corporation.

As noted above, the decision of LLC or corporation depends on your specific situation and the best person to advise you is a competent attorney after having met with you to discuss your particular circumstances.

For a more in-depth discussion about the LLC or Corporation comparison of for a FREE LLC GUIDE, visit The LLC Learning Center at
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