Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Why You Need a Durable Power of Attorney Now!

Planning for unfortunate events such as serious illness or injury is rarely on anyone's list of favorite pastimes. Sometimes, though, enduring the small discomfort that may accompany preparing for the unexpected will avoid untold anguish on the part of your family and friends. This is certainly the case with the Durable Power of Attorney, an often simple document that becomes so very important if sickness or injury renders you unable to take care of your own affairs.

Power of Attorney Defined

A Power of Attorney is a document in which you (as the "Principal") allow someone else (the "Agent" or "Attorney-in-fact") to act legally on your behalf. The Power of Attorney may be limited to very specific actions that the Agent is authorized to take on your behalf. On the other hand it may give the Agent very broad powers. In either event, the Agent you appoint in the Power of Attorney should be someone that you trust without reservation. That could be a family member, an advisor, a trustworthy friend or a bank or similar institution.

The "Durable" Power of Attorney

The significance of having a "Durable" Power of Attorney is best understood if you know what can happen with the plain old garden variety of Power of Attorney.

If you sign a Power of Attorney that is not "durable," the document remains effective only while you are alive and competent to handle your own affairs. If you become incompetent or die, the Power of Attorney is automatically revoked by law and your Agent is no longer able to act on your behalf. This prevents a Power of Attorney from becoming irrevocable inadvertently, and, until recent times, it was the only way a Power of Attorney could be prepared.

The non-durable Power of Attorney has limited usefulness for family and estate planning purposes, though, because the Power of Attorney is often most needed when you have become incapacitated! That is when you really need someone else that is able to make legal decisions or take other actions on your behalf.

All fifty states now permit the use of a "durable" Power of Attorney that is not revoked simply because the Principal becomes incapacitated or mentally incompetent. This makes the Durable Power of Attorney a far more reliable document, particularly for family and estate planning purposes, since you may now authorize your Agent to act on your behalf even after illness, injury or other cause has rendered you unable to manage your own affairs. Even with a Durable Power of Attorney, however, the Principal's death causes an immediate revocation of the document and termination of the powers that are given to the Agent.

A Matter of Convenience

The Durable Power of Attorney is often used as a matter of convenience.

Suppose, for example, you have your home listed for sale. You have also planned a long awaited trip to visit Aunt Trixie in Deadwood, South Dakota, and you are concerned that an interested buyer may come along while you are on the road. A Durable Power of Attorney would be handy here to appoint someone you trust to act in your absence to negotiate the sale and sign any documents that are needed to make the deal binding.

The Durable Power of Attorney could be prepared so that it is effective only until the date you plan to return from your trip, and it might describe specific terms that your Agent must include in the sale, such as the minimum sale price that is acceptable to you.

A Matter of Protecting Loved Ones

What happens if, from illness, injury or another cause, you become physically or mentally incapacitated to the point that you are no longer able to handle your own legal affairs?

Let's suppose again that while you are incapacitated it becomes necessary to mortgage your home to pay your medical bills. Who will sign the mortgage? Even if your home is jointly owned with your spouse, he cannot obtain a mortgage without your signature.

In those circumstances it would be necessary to request the local probate court to appoint a guardian for you that has the power to handle your legal affairs. In many states, this type of guardian is referred to as a "conservator". Included in the conservator's powers might be the power to borrow money and sign a mortgage on your behalf making it possible to obtain the funds needed to pay the medical bills.

However, you may have heard that it is advantageous to avoid probate whenever possible, particularly if there is a good alternative available. The delay and expense associated with probate proceedings and the fact that they are conducted in the probate court, a public forum, make that good advice in most circumstances. And there is a better alternative than probate, but it requires you to act before the incapacity arises - you need to sign a Durable Power of Attorney.

When used in this estate planning context, the Durable Power of Attorney is generally worded very broadly to give your Agent the power to step into your legal shoes in almost any circumstance. In effect, you tell your Agent "You can do anything I can do."

Now, if you have prepared the Durable Power of Attorney and then become incapacitated, no one has to go through a probate proceeding to appoint a guardian or conservator to act for you - you have already given your Agent the power to do so. As you can see, the Durable Power of Attorney can save precious time and expense in critical situations and avoid having your personal affairs become the subject of a public proceeding.

Appointing a Successor Agent

It is often a good idea to appoint one or more successor Agents. The Agent you appoint in your Durable Power of Attorney may die or for some other reason become unable or unwilling to act as your Agent. In that case, you may be left without someone to act for you when you most need that assistance.

Appointing successors to your first choice of Agent helps insure that someone is always available to handle your affairs. Of course, each successor that you appoint should be someone that has your complete trust.

Revoking a Power of Attorney

As long as you are competent, you have the power to revoke your Durable Power of Attorney. To do so, send written notice to your Agent notifying him or her that the document has been revoked. Once the Agent has notice of your revocation, the Agent may take no further action under the Durable Power of Attorney. However, your revocation will not undo any permissible actions that the Agent has taken prior to being notified that the Power of Attorney has been terminated.

You must also notify third parties with whom your Agent has been dealing that the Durable Power of Attorney has been revoked. For example, if the Agent has been dealing with a stockbroker, you must notify the stockbroker as soon as possible. Do this in writing, as well, and do it immediately. Third parties who do not receive notice of the revocation are entitled to, and probably will, continue to rely on the Durable Power of Attorney.

Making the Durable Power of Attorney Effective upon Incapacity.

It is possible to have a Durable Power of Attorney that only becomes effective if and when you become incapacitated. This document is referred as a "springing" Durable Power of Attorney because it "springs to life" on the occurrence of a future event - your incapacity. The document should include a detailed definition of "disability" to make clear the circumstances in which your Agent may act on your behalf.

Knowing that your Agent is unable to exercise his or her powers until you are actually unable to do so yourself may make using the Durable Power of Attorney more comfortable for you. Unfortunately, even with a good definition of incapacity in the springing Durable Power of Attorney, your Agent may find that third parties are simply not willing to make the judgment that you are indeed disabled. If they are wrong, they may be held liable to you for any damages that you sustain as a result of the error in judgment. You may therefore find the springing document cannot be relied upon in all circumstances.

Don't Procrastinate!

Estate planning is easy to put off. But don't! Advance planning, such as executing a Durable Power of Attorney, may make a horrible circumstance for you and your family just a bit more bearable.

John Pollock is an attorney that specializes in estate planning. He is also the webmaster of [http://www.forms-free-4-all.com], a website offering free legal forms with easy to understand explanations of the relevant law.
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Monday, March 30, 2015

Is An LLC Best?

I am not a lawyer, I am a Judgment Broker. This article is my opinion, and not legal advice, based on my experience in California, and laws vary in each state. If you ever need any legal advice or a strategy to use, please contact a lawyer.

A Limited Liability Company (LLC) is a state-defined entity that can be thought of as being a hybrid business entity, having some features of both partnerships and corporations.

LLC's are popular primarily because they are more flexible, and are simpler to operate than type S or C corporations. Some think LLCs save taxes, however most often, they do not.

In some ways, LLCs are similar to corporations. Both LLCs and corporations provide basic liability protection for owners and/or shareholders, and officers.

One way LLCs are different, is that LLCs have owners, and corporations have shareholders. A LLC can have several owners, called "members" or "partners", named members, for the rest of this article.

A LLC's partnership agreement defines the member relationships in the LLC, and includes an ownership agreement.

LLCs can have at least one managing member, and may also choose to appoint officers. LLCs usually have an operating agreement, that describes the LLC's function. LLC members can be any combination of individuals, corporations, and other LLCs.

Double taxation occurs when a company first pays tax on their profits; and then their officers, employees, and shareholders, get taxed again on their individual incomes.

Historically, one of the primary reasons that LLCs were chosen, was for their potential tax savings. LLCs avoid the potential double taxation problems that C-type corporations can have.

Double taxation is not really an important financial issue now, because the IRS has caught up, and removed most of the way taxes could be saved on both common and creative types of income.

Now, there seems to be no tax advantages or disadvantages to forming a LLC. No matter what corporate structure or partnership one picks, they must pay taxes. Tax payments may be split up in different ways, however one way or another, income is taxed.

Single-owner LLCs are taxed the same as sole proprietorships, and file the same 1040 tax return and Schedule C, as a sole proprietor.

Single-owner entities rarely get the same liability protection that larger companies get. Multiple-owner LLCs may potentially provide better liability protection than some corporations.

Multiple-owner LLCs are taxed the same as partnerships. Partners in a LLC file the same 1065 partnership tax return, as would be done with any conventional business partnership.

Owners of LLCs are considered to be self-employed, and must pay a self-employment tax of about 15%, on the total net income of the business.

In C or S corporations, only the salary paid to employees is subject to employment tax. The IRS monitors salaries, and will define income as salary, if they think a company is not paying adequate salaries. Payroll taxation is expensive.

The actual advantages of LLCs over S or C corporations is that they are:

1) Much more flexible in ownership.

2) Simpler to operate.

3) Not subject to as many corporate formalities, or reporting requirements.

4) Owners of a LLC can distribute profits any way they want.

Usually, the state, county, and city, requires LLCs to pay them the same taxes, fees, and registration fees, as corporations must. Also, many states require LLCs to hire an accountant to prepare the LLC's tax returns.

LLCs no longer save you money. The best reason to choose to form a LLC, is the flexibility they offer.

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Saturday, March 28, 2015

DIVORCE !!! Easier than you think? - By The People Fairfield CA

Rene goes over how a divorce does not always need to involve a full legal team. He explains the process of how By The People can help file the paperwork necessary for the courts. See more at http://www.bythepeopleca.com

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

What Happens If You Become Incapacitated Without A Durable Power Of Attorney

A General Durable Power Of Attorney is an estate planning document that is meant to be in place for if you become incapacitated or disabled and are no longer able to speak for yourself or carry on your financial affairs. The durable nature of the power of the attorney comes into play when a trusted person that you name in the document steps into place for you to manage your assets and handle your affairs for you until you recover or for the rest of your life. What happens if you do not have this important document in place and you become disabled or incapacitated and are no longer able to act on your own behalf?

If you become incapacitated in most states without a General Durable Power Of Attorney in place for yourself then the Probate Court in your county steps in and decides who would be the person to handle your affairs that would have named in your power of attorney if would have properly made one. The probate court in your county of residence most likely must appoint both a Guardian and Conservator for you. A Guardian is appointed to look after your health and well-being and make decisions that are in your best interest of your person. A Conservator is appointed by the Probate Court to look after your money and make sure that you are not being taken advantage of financially. The conservator must file strict accounting reports with the Probate Court and will most likely have to post a bond in case any money is mishandled. This process can be extremely costly and drain your assets before you get to enjoy them again after you regain capacity or pass them on to your loved ones.

A General Durable Power Of Attorney eliminates the need to appoint a Guardian and Conservator as a trusted person is named and given the powers to carry out your needs if you become incapacitated. This document allows you to be in control of your own affairs through anther instead of the choice being out of your hands and made by a government agency at a much greater cost of time and money. While it is not pleasant to think of yourself being incapacitated at any point in your life, it is a reality that most people do not die right away and go through some period of disability. Protect yourself by planning ahead.

Evan Guthrie Law Firm is licensed to practice law throughout the state of South Carolina. The Evan Guthrie Law Firm practices in the areas of estate planning probate personal injury and divorce and family law. For further information visit his website at http://www.ekglaw.com. Evan Guthrie Law Firm 164 Market Street Suite 362 Charleston SC 29401 843-926-3813
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Monday, March 23, 2015

By The People FAQs

  • Are BY THE PEOPLE Personnel attorneys? No, we are not attorneys. We are Legal Document Assistants. In California, we are a licensed and bonded profession.
  • What if I need legal advise? You can always consult with an attorney of your choice. We can provide you with a referral for an excellent local attorney who specializes in cases similar to yours if you have questions we cannot answer for you, or your situation is more complicated than our services are meant to help with.
  • Do you have a Notary Public? Yes, whenever we are open we have a Notary Public on staff. If you are a BY THE PEOPLE customer, all Notarizations of your documents are included in our fees. If you have documents not prepared by BY THE PEOPLE, we charge $10.00 per signature you need notarized, in Cash Only. You must sign the document in our presence and provide valid photo identification.
  • Does BY THE PEOPLE handle Criminal Matters? No, we only handle uncontested civil matters. However, if you would like to contact us, we may be able to refer an excellent local attorney to you.
  • I need to have my documents prepared immediately. Do you have Rush or Same-Day document preparation services? Yes, we can prepare certain documents within a few hours, if necessary. Rush and Same-Day services are available for the following documents: Wills, Powers of Attorney, Health Care Directives, Deeds, LLC and Incorporation Articles. A modest Rush Fees will apply to these services.
  • How long will it take to prepare my documents? The documents we prepare at BY THE PEOPLE are typed specifically at your direction. All documents are then rigorously proofed to ensure you receive the highest quality legal documents available anywhere. Most of our documents are prepared and ready for you to sign within one week, depending on your situation. 
For more information please visit http://bythepeopleca.com/

Sunday, March 22, 2015

By The People Commercial

We're a legal document assistance company, and basically that means we help people do their own documents. The main two services we provide are living trusts and divorce. So what we pride ourselves is going above and beyond for each and every one of our customers. Whether that means sometimes going to the house and doing a home visit for home bound people who need that service. Sometimes its a notary, sometimes it's a living trust. We work with everybody. If you have a legal need, we're going to be here to help you.

Part of the Free Commercial Push by A Squared. Published online only.

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Easily Misused Estate Planning Terms

Wills and Living Wills

Wills and Living Wills are key parts of any good estate plan. However, though the two sound similar they serve very different purposes. A Living Will states your choices for the kind of medical care you want to receive if you become sick or injured and are unable to talk. A Last Will and Testament, often referred to as just a Will, deals with your property and how you want it distributed if you should die. Therefore, a will is only effective after you die and a living will is only effective before you die and when you incapacitated.

Advance Directive vs Advanced Directive

A Living Will is a type of advance directive. All advance directives are documents a person creates that state what his or her choices are in the event he or she becomes incapacitated or otherwise unable to communicate with other people. Advance directives, such as Living Wills or health care powers of attorney, typically address financial or medical situations and can state specific choices as well as nominate someone else to make decisions on the incapacitated person's behalf.

These documents are referred to as "advance" directives because you make them in advance or in preparation for the possibility that you become incapacitated. Some people mistakenly use the term "advanced" directive, implying that the documents are somehow more complicated or important than others. This is not true, and anyone can make advance directives fairly easily as long as they ensure the documents comply with state law.

Probate Estate vs Trust Estate vs Taxable Estate

An estate is a general term used to describe an area or amount of property. It is sometimes used when referring to assets that are part of the probate estate at someone's death, or assets that are not payable to another person at the owner's death or not part of a trust estate. If an asset is part of a trust estate, then generally the asset will not be part of the probate estate. Further, when considering the taxable estate of an individual for estate tax purposes the IRS will consider the gross estate of the decedent to include the value at the time of his death of all property, real or personal, tangible or intangible, wherever situated. If property is part of a trust estate, it may or may not be part of the gross estate for federal estate tax purposes depending on certain facts about the trust.

Medicare vs Medicaid

Medicare is a federal program attached to Social Security. It is available to all U.S. citizens 65 years of age or older and it also covers people with certain disabilities. It is available regardless of income.
Medicaid is a joint federal and state program that helps low-income individuals and families pay for the costs associated with medical and long-term custodial care. Unlike Medicare, Medicaid has strict eligibility requirements.

Experienced estate planning attorneys Dallas TX of the John R. Vermillion & Associates, LLC offers estate planning and business planning resources to residents of Dallas TX. To learn more about these free resources, please visit http://www.revocabletrusts.com today.
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Friday, March 20, 2015

Suspension, Termination and Conflicts Relating to Advance Directives and Powers of Attorney

Powers of attorney are commonly used instruments, but few people spend the time to really understand how they actually operate. This includes attorneys and lay persons. Depending on whether a power of attorney is considered durable, there are certain events, such as a principal's subsequent incapacity, which may limit, or restrain an agent from exercising his or her enumerated powers pursuant to the power of attorney instrument.

Let's take a look at just some of the events which can result in a suspension or termination of a power of attorney. Firstly, if a power of attorney is not durable, meaning it does not contain certain language referenced by law, the following events will terminate a power of attorney. 1) principal dies, 2) becomes incapacitated. Of course a subsequently executed "poa" that explicitly revokes all previous ones, will also result in its termination.

If a poa is durable, the scenario mentioned above is a little different. While the death of the principal still results in termination, subsequent incapacity of the principal could lead to a multitude of scenarios. If a petition to determine the incapacity of the principle is filed, the authorities granted in the power of attorney are suspended until the petition is dismissed or the court enters an order authorizing the agent to carry out powers granted to him. Certain powers, like the authority to make health care decisions for the principal, remain effective until the Court orders otherwise.

In emergency situations, if the agent feels he needs to act on the principal's behalf the agent may ask or "petition" the court to allow him to use powers which are otherwise suspended, after a petition to determine incapacity has been filed.

Other issues arise when powers of attorney conflict with advance directives which the principal may have executed and which may have given different individuals authority to act on his or her behalf. These disputes sometimes involve family members, who have different opinions on what is best for the principal. The law provides that if an advance directive and a poa conflict, the advance directive controls, unless a poa is later executed, and expressly states otherwise.

While do-it your self forms for powers of attorney and other documents such as a living will and advance directive are easily obtainable, understanding how these instruments interact and often conflict, requires a little bit of patience, and in many instances some attorney advice.
If you would like additional information on this topic or other legal issues, feel free to visit http://Schneiderlawfirmpa.com.
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Thursday, March 19, 2015

Divorce/Legal Seperation - By The People

BY THE PEOPLE can help with Uncontested Divorce or Legal Separation. For couples who can resolve their own asset and debt division and/or child issues, BY THE PEOPLE can prepare all of the necessary documents for you to obtain your divorce. We also do all of the filing and procedural work throughout the process.

Since we are a local company and file divorces every day, we can provide you with up to date information about filing fees and the local court systems. In California the minium time period for a divorce is 6 months from the date of service.

Legal Separation is the same process for the court and same documents needed.You will still need to address all of the same issues, the only difference is the end result. You will still be married, having dealt with all asset/debt division and child custody, visitation, support, and if you decide to go forward with a divorce, you will need to start over from the beginning.

Our fees to prepare all of your divorce or legal separation documents is $599.00 if there are minor children, or $499.00 if there are no minor children. The only other fee you will pay will be the filing fee for the court of $435.00. Our fee is due up front, and we accept cash, check or credit cards. The filing fee for the court is not due up front; it is due as soon as you are ready to file with the court. The paperwork is usually ready to file within a week of starting the process. The Court only accepts cash, check or money order for their fees.

When you are ready to get started with your divorce or legal separation at BY THE PEOPLE, you may make an appointment or come in as a walk-in to our office at 1371-C Oliver Road, Fairfield CA. We will have you fill out a worksheet that will give us the information we need about you, your spouse and the issues your need to address in your divorce. Most of our customer find it takes about 30 minutes to complete the necessary information in our worksheet. You may come in with your spouse or you may come in on your own to fill out the worksheet and begin the process. The choice is yours.

For more information, please visit http://bythepeopleca.com/

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Medical Power of Attorney

A Medical Power of Attorney gives specific instructions, prepared in advance, that are intended to direct medical care for an individual if he or she becomes unable to do so in the future. Plainly speaking, a Medical Power of Attorney is made in anticipation of a medical emergency. If you are in an accident or suffer a disease or disorder that may leave you incapable of making a sound medical decision, a Medical Power of Attorney permits you to choose in advance who will represent and enforce your interests. The person authorizing the other to act on his behalf is the "principal" and the one authorized to act is the "agent".

A Medical Power of Attorney should be given to someone whom you trust unreservedly; this is an individual who will be making decisions for you when you are incapacitated, even if you are not on life support or terminally ill. However, an agent does not have the authority to act until the principal's attending physician certifies in writing that the principal is incompetent.

A Medical Power of Attorney is not legally effective unless the principal signs a disclosure statement that he or she has read and understood the contents before signing the document. If the principal is physically unable to sign, another person may sign the document in his or her presence and at his or her directive. Two qualified witnesses, who are competent adults, must witness the procedure. At least one of them must not be related to the principal, the principal's attending physician or the attending physician's employee, entitled to a part of the principal's estate, an individual who has a claim against the principal's estate, or an officer, director, partner or business office employee of the healthcare facility.

An individual may revoke the Medical Power of Attorney by notifying either the agent or the principal's health care provider of his or her intent to revoke the document. This revocation will take place regardless of the principal's capability to make sound medical judgments. Further, if the principal executes a later Medical Power of Attorney, then all prior ones are revoked. If the principal designates his or her spouse to be the agent, a divorce revokes the Medical Power of Attorney.
An agent, acting in good faith, will not incur criminal or civil liability for a medical decision made under a Medical Power of Attorney.

Power Of Attorney [http://www.WetPluto.com/Durable-Power-of-Attorney.html] provides detailed information about power of attorney, power of attorney forms, medical power of attorney, limited power of attorney and more. Power Of Attorney is the sister site of Divorce Legal Forms [http://www.LegalForms-Web.com].
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Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Benefits of an LLC For Rental Property Owners

Rental property owners are entrepreneurs. And as entrepreneurs, their primary goal is to maximize profit. One of the most basic steps in maximizing profit is to minimize costs and other liabilities. Recently, the up and coming trend of protecting one's personal assets from the liabilities of a rental business is to set up an LLC over the rental properties. With this LLC, the rental property owner's personal property, like home, car and other assets, are protected from the unpredictable demands of owning rental property. There are also other benefits of an LLC for rental property owners.

Personal property protection

First of, what is an LLC? LLC stands for Limited Liability Company. Without the LLC, business owners are liable for damages and other losses from their business even with their own personal assets.

To illustrate, a sole-proprietor will have to pay for anything and everything that deals with his business out of his own pockets. He can never interpose that his business is bankrupt when he still maintains a personal bank account, his own car and his own home. His personal assets will have to answer for the deficiency. Corporate shareholders do not have this problem because they are protected by the law on corporations that shareholders are only liable for losses out of their corporate shares, hence, their personal property is protected and remains untouched by any corporate liability. The downside of forming a corporation though is that the process itself is meticulous and profits will have to be shared with a handful of shareholders.

LLC combines the ease of being a sole-proprietor with the potential of earning huge profits all by yourself and the protection to personal assets that corporations offer. Personal property protection is the most basic and primary of the benefits of an LLC for rental property owners.

Tax advantages

Another of the benefits of an LLC for rental property owners is the tax advantages. Has even better tax treatment than when in a corporation. A corporate shareholder in essence will have to pay taxes twice. First, when the corporation itself pays its taxes, and second when the shareholder has to pay his own tax from the income derived from the corporation. An LLC is not taxed as a separate entity. The property owner will only have to pay his taxes once, upon his receipt of the income from the rental property. Also, the net loss in the LLC can be declared as a personal deduction for the property owner!

Be a professional by name

Real estate laws require one to spend a certain number of hours in real estate activities to be called as professionals in the real estate industry. But being in an LLC, these requirements are cut in as much as half!

An LLC may be obtained for separate properties

Another of the great benefits of an LLC for rental property owners is that a different or separate LLC may be obtained for each and every property. Why is this beneficial? Because when an investment is sued covered by an LLC, all the properties belonging to that LLC will stand liable for the suit. Covering separate properties with separate LLCs will only make the specific property or investment liable for the claim it is sued for.

These are only the basic benefits of an LLC for rental property owners. And these are already enough to convince any serious business-minded property owner, what would a more detailed study of the benefits do? Start protecting your own personal property and increasing your profits all in the same time. Get an LLC now!

North New England [http://northnewenglandhomes.com/] Homes Blog and North New England Homes can offer you a whole deal of information about the real estate market. Whether you want to sell your house, buy a property or rent one, getting all the information that you need will give you a great advantage.
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Sunday, March 15, 2015

Defining Legal Terms - By The People Fairfield CA

Rene goes over what types of questions they can help answer at By The People. A legal document preparation company. See more at http://www.bythepeopleca.com

Saturday, March 14, 2015

5 Reasons an LLC Is Right For You

As a business owner, you can run your business as a sole proprietorship, or it can be operated as a formal structure, for example an LLC. Forming LLC as the business structure is an exceedingly good choice for the average entrepreneur. Managing your company as an LLC brings many benefits.

Following are just a few of many reasons to contemplate having an LLC, if you are a small business owner:

1. Protection of personal assets - As a business owner, you are more apt to be sued. You need to protect your personal assets from those of your company, so your personal monies are protected in case a lawsuit is brought against your company. By starting LLC that is correctly setup, you are usually protected.

2. Have a professional image - Nothing says professional company like a legitimate business structure. Just about anybody can start a company, but it is the people that go the extra distance by setting up a business structure show how serious they are about their company, and people take notice of this.

3. Trust - If your business is an LLC, you are making it particularly easy to discover suppliers in which to do business with you, and particularly easy to get a business loan. Operating your business as a profession, and not a hobby, is a wonderful way to gain trust with those companies that you need to work with.

4. Low audit risk - Sole proprietorships are more at risk to facing an IRS audit than LLCs. This most likely has something to do with the fact that a person might be using the business as an excuse to get some tax benefits, though they would get more if they actually had an LLC and the IRS is onto these people. However, if a person has taken the effort of LLC formation, it is likely they are in business for all of the right reasons.

5. Business flexibility - When operating as an LLC, you have greater choices in how to handle operating your business. Adding additional owners is a simple process, which is not possible as a sole proprietor. A limited liability company is a very flexible business structure that gives a variety of options on how you wish to manage your company.

If you are going to run a business, then you should do what you can to run it as effectively as possible. Making use of an LLC as your business structure has many virtues, even more than those listed in this article. Treat your business right and make it an LLC.

Will Karter is an expert when it comes to Business Entity Incorporation Search and has been working as a paralegal for over 5 years.
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Thursday, March 12, 2015

Why Forming an LLC is a Good Idea

If you are experienced in running your business, you understand the importance of getting the correct corporate form in place. You should seek to have a structure that will not only aid long term expansion but also protect your assets. The good news - there are a lot of potential forms your business can take.

You should consider, if you have a small business, forming an LLC. Think about setting up an LLC if you have a small business. Fortunately, they are simple to create. There is little paperwork with them. Further, in many states, you won't need to file an annual report.

Also, LLC forms a business structure that can protect your personal assets. Just keep you LLC compliant and your personal property is protected.

With an LLC, you can safe guard your business name.Also, LLCs allow unlimited owners. This will help give your business growth room. Also, owners don't need to have US citizenship.

In addition, an LLC doesn't require meetings. It also needs little paperwork. And you can flow your profit and loss to your personal taxes.

Keep in mind that setting up an LLC has fees and paperwork. Also, you need to make sure you are following all city and state laws. Thus, only consider an LLC if you have a clear business plan.

Overall, an LLC is great for small business. So you should at least consider one if you are serious about your business. Remember, it can save you time and money, both of which you can invest in your business!

David is the creator of http://www.LLCFormsExpert.com [http://LLCFormsExpert.com], a site dedicated to helping you with forming an LLC [http://LLCFormsExpert.com]
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Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Why You Should Integrate a Family Trust with Your Business

Utilizing a Revocable Living Trust can be an affordable way to ensure your business passes effectively to your family or loved ones upon your death.

Monday, March 9, 2015

Living Wills and Healthcare Power of Attorneys Help to Make Sure Your Wishes are Met

No one can foresee problems that may arise should he become incapacitated. Yet, you can avoid negative consequences of unforeseen problems by creating Living Wills and Healthcare Power of Attorneys (HCPOA).

Setting up a Living Will or HCPOA is a relatively simple task. The first step it to consult with an attorney that specializes in estate planning to ensure that your documents are clear. Here's an overview of what you can expect from your Living Will and HCPOA.

Healthcare Power of Attorney

The HCPOA, otherwise known as a "healthcare proxy" is a legal document that enables an individual that you appoint (your "agent") to act as your healthcare representative if you become incapacitated. The agent becomes your acting representative at the moment you become incapacitated, thus eliminating the need for your loved ones to argue over your rights and wishes in court.

Your agent has the authority to request or deny any medical treatment that he determines to be appropriate. Therefore, it is a good idea to choose someone that you trust as your agent. Please note: In most states, your spouse will be your default agent. If you are not married but are in a lifelong relationship your partner, he does not automatically become your agent. Make sure that you appoint your partner as your agent to ensure that he or she has control over your medical decisions if you are unable to make them.

Because your agent has whatever powers you give him or her, make sure that he or she understands your desires. Some of the decisions he or she may need to make include but are not limited to:

  • Deciding whether or not you will receive medical treatment
  • Withdrawing life-support
Living Will
A Living Will and HCPOA should be used in tandem, since one document complements the other. Your Living Will is a document that clearly expresses your desires. In short, your Living Will provides your medical team with instructions for how to carry out your wishes should you become incapacitated. For example, if you become brain dead, you can state in your Living Will that you wish to receive or not to receive life support.

By creating a Living Will, you ensure that your desires will be carried out without court involvement that can be costly and stressful for your family. Criteria for enacting a Living Will vary by state; so make sure that you consult with an attorney to ensure that your Living Will complies with the rules in your state.

Thomas McNally is the staff writer at the National Directory of Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law Attorneys. McNally stresses the importance of finding a qualified estate planning attorney to ensure that your estate passes to whom you want, when you want, and is carried out in the manner you've chosen.
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Sunday, March 8, 2015

The Importance of a Healthcare Proxy and Living Will

A living will is a legal document that describes your end of life wishes. You create it when you are alive, but it does not become valid until you are in an end of life situation. With a living will your agent(s) have final decision, but it should be made with medical doctors and other healthcare officials to be sure you are given the correct prognosis and so that your agents can make the right decision. You should give a copy of your living will and healthcare proxy to your local hospital, doctor, nursing facility or hospice care agency.


The living will covers common decisions your loved ones can make when you are near to dying. You have the choice to fill out the form in whatever fashion you like. Choices can be made regarding keeping you alive by machines, being kept on a feeding tube with no hope of recovery, being in a persistent vegetative state and more.


Living wills are available online and can be obtained for free. You need not pay for a living will to be drafted. Each state has its own differences so be sure you use the one for your state.

Once completed, the form should be signed in the presence of two witnesses. The witnesses sign the document and attest that you signed of your own free will and that they are not your appointed health care agents or proxies. Some states do not allow relatives or people responsible for make medical decisions to be witnesses.

In your living will, you will designate someone who will be your proxy or agent. This person will be the one you choose to carry out the details of the document. Choose a family member who understands your wishes and has agreed to see that they are carried out. Do not choose a doctor or any employee of a hospital or institution that is treating you at the time it is executed. You can change your agent or proxy, but be sure that whoever got the original one has the new one replaced. The same applies to other changes to the document.

Most people don't like thinking about these things, however they are extremely important. You don't know when you will be in a situation in which this document will be needed. Be sure to complete it now before you can't. Consider all of the possibilities there are regarding your last wishes medically. There are certain powers given to your agent(s). Here are some general rules:

• "Full power to consent, refuse consent, or withdraw consent to all medical, surgical, hospital and related health care treatments and procedures on my behalf, according to my wishes as stated in this document, or as stated in a separate Living Will, Health Care Directive, or other similar type document, or as expressed to my agent by me;"
• "Full power to make decisions on whether to provide, withhold, or withdraw artificial nutrition and hydration on my behalf, according to my wishes as stated in this document, or as stated in a separate Living Will, Health Care Directive, or other similar type document, or as expressed to my agent by me;"
• "Full power to review and receive any information regarding my physical or mental health, including medical and hospital records, in accordance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, 42 USC 1320d ("HIPAA");"

• "Full power to sign any releases in order to obtain this information;"
• "Full power to sign any documents required to request, withdraw, or refuse treatment or to be released or transferred to another medical facility."

Your document should contain sections covering the following situations:

1. "If I have an incurable and irreversible (terminal) condition that will result in my death within a relatively short time, I direct that... "

2. "If I am diagnosed as being in an irreversible coma and, to a reasonable degree of medical certainty, I will not regain consciousness, I direct that... "

3. "If I am diagnosed as being in a persistent vegetative state and, to a reasonable degree of medical certainty, I will not regain consciousness, I direct that... "

You are able to decide which choices can be made.

Other areas to be covered include:

• Intravenous and Tube Feeding
• Life Sustaining Surgery
• New Medical Developments
• Other Non-Conventional Treatments
• Home or Hospital


A living will gives you the power to choose how you would like to be cared for in the days leading to your death. It also removes some of the burden from your family when they know that they are following your wishes.

Don't fail to prepare this document. As has been stated herein already, you don't know when you will be in a situation in which this document will be needed.

We provide accounting and tax preparation services and we are open year round. We also prepare living wills at a reasonable rate. Visit our website for a listing of all services: http://crossroadsacctg.webs.com
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Saturday, March 7, 2015

Use a Power of Attorney and a Medical Directive to Appoint Someone You Trust to Act on Your Behalf

Many begin arranging their estate plans when they retire. But they should also arrange for what happens when they become unable to make decisions but are still living.

Dementia and other afflictions leading to mental disabilities destroy our ability to act for ourselves - such as handling our financial and medical decisions. If you haven't formally assigned someone to make those decisions for you, someone else will - and may not make the kind of decisions you'd like.

But you can only choose someone to act for you when you're mentally competent. So, below, I discuss the type of powers of attorney you can assign to anyone to act for you.

When you assign a power of attorney to someone, he can then act on your behalf. That person does not have to be a lawyer. It can be anyone who's of legal age and who you trust to handle decisions as you would want them handled.

Most often, you'll need to validate this assignment with a signed - and possibly notarized - written document since hospitals, banks and the IRS generally want proof when someone else is acting for you.

According to the wording of your assignment, you can limit the area and time for which you assign the power of attorney. You may assign one person a power of attorney to handle your financial affairs, and another person to handle your heath-related decisions.

You can assign someone to begin acting for you under his power of attorney at any time. But since we're concerned with the circumstance of you becoming mentally incompetent to act, let's review some different types of powers of attorney you can choose from.

A Limited Power of Attorney means someone you choose can act for you to handle some restricted area of your life such as paying bills, handling financial decision, or investing. You'd have to specify those areas clearly.

A General Power of Attorney is not restricted to any single area. So whoever you chose can act for you in all respects.

Any power of attorney will cease when you become mentally incompetent unless you specify otherwise. Two types of powers of attorney remain in effect under your incompetence - which is the point of this article.

A Durable Power of Attorney keeps your assignment valid even when you become incapacitated. So be sure to make your assignment 'durable' if that's your intention.

A Springing Power of Attorney comes into effect only when you become incapacitated - and not before. Of course, for this power of attorney to come into effect some 'proof' that you are sufficiently incapacitated will be required. This may require a doctor's letter and some court action if necessary.

It might happen that someone you to whom you assign a power of attorney may be unscrupulous and will waste or steal your assets. This can happen if you're elderly and slowing down about things. So, if you're unsure of how someone will handle your affairs, you may want to grant him power of attorney while you're in good mental health to see how he performs. That's not a bad idea, in any case, since you can discuss with him what you think of his decisions to help frame his future ones.

Unless you make a power of attorney irrevocable, you can revoke it simply be telling that person his assignment is revoked. But be sure to notify others that the power was revoked, too.

Health Care-Related Power of Attorney When you become incapacitated, you may want some one to make health-related decisions for you. You do this with a Medical Durable Power of Attorney. This is also called a Health Care Proxy. It takes effect only when you require medical treatment and your physician determines that you can't communicate your wishes concerning treatment.

Again, you must execute this document when you're competent. Your health care proxy ensures your instructions will be carried out. Some states differ on what decisions can be included in a health care proxy. So check the rules in your state.

Shane Flait is a writer and consultant on financial, legal, tax, and retirement issues. He explains the issues and gives you workable strategies to accomplish your goals. Find out more and get a free report on Managing Your Retirement => http://www.easyretirementknowhow.com/FreeReportandSignUp.htm
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Friday, March 6, 2015

Estate Planning : Have You Been Named in the Will?

If you are a beneficiary in a will, you will most likely receive notice after the will is entered in probate court. Learn what to do if you have been named in a will from an estate planning and probate lawyer in this free video on estate law.

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Uncontested Divorce - Do You Know How It Works?

An uncontested divorce is a divorce in which both parties can agree to the terms of the divorce. With an uncontested divorce, both parties negotiate the terms of the divorce without court proceedings. One lawyer represents one of the parties and prepares the divorce documents. Generally speaking, the lawyer will meet with the party they are representing and start the divorce proceedings. The parties negotiate the terms until both parties are satisfied. There are advantages and disadvantages to an uncontested divorce.

An uncontested divorce is considerably cheaper than going to court. If you can negotiate the terms of the divorce agreement before contacting a lawyer to begin the divorce proceedings, the cost is minimal. It saves time for everyone involved. When facing a divorce, saving money is a huge benefit. This is money that can be used for making necessary changes and for living expenses.

An uncontested divorce can also help maintain a level of civility between the parties. If the parties to the divorce have an amiable relationship, it is best to try to protect that mutual respect, especially if there are children involved. Another advantage is the privacy that an uncontested divorce offers in contrast to court proceedings. The divorce will be a matter of public record, but the visibility of the negotiations and the actions taken is potentially private and limited by what the parties disclose in the documents.

Just because the parties do not immediately agree to terms of the divorce doesn't mean that they should put the decisions in the hands of a judge. It may just mean that more negotiations are needed. However, there are times when an uncontested divorce is not necessarily the best route. There are some disadvantages to uncontested divorces.

If one party is exerting power and control over the negotiations or if there is a history of domestic violence, then an uncontested divorce is usually a bad idea. The victimized party is not in a position to look out for their own best interest. An uncontested divorce does not ensure that the agreement will be fair and just. Therefore, if one party is unable to do this for themselves, an uncontested divorce is not for them.

An uncontested divorce will not work if the parties cannot tolerate each other enough to negotiate the terms of the divorce. If they can't have reasonably civil discussions and come to an agreement, then attempting an uncontested divorce is a waste of time. Sometimes, this hostility will lessen with time and an uncontested divorce will become a viable option.

Moses Wright is the founder of Divorce-Papers.org. More information on Divorce Papers, Selecting Divorce Attorney and Divorce Settlements - Assets & Liabilities can be found on his website. You are welcome to reprint this article if you keep the content and live link intact.
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Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Legal Questions : How Does a Living Trust Work?

The idea of a living trust is that, while a person is still alive, they transfer their assets into a trust document that administers the assets. Avoid probate through a living trust with help from a certified civil mediator in this free video on law and legal questions.

Monday, March 2, 2015

Power of Attorney - 6 Factors You Should Consider When Nominating the Best Agent

Ever wondered how your modest finances or properties are handled, in case something occurs to you or you will have to go away somewhere? In that case consider the power of attorney. What is power of attorney? This is a legal document that would facilitate you to allow an organization or a person manages your business matters and your finances.

The principal is person who is creating or signing the power of attorney, while the agent or the attorney-in-fact is the person who would be granted with authority. Because the power of attorney will give the agent the control over banking, credit and other financial concerns, it is important to be made with care that's why legal assistance is important.

Power of attorney can be divided into 2 types, the general and the specific. The general power of attorney can handle different personal and business transactions while the specific power of attorney identifies specific transaction when the document would take effect.

Here are some factors you should consider when choosing the best agent for your power of attorney:

• Capability. It is much recommended to think about the capability of agent in managing legal matters and principal's property. You should not entrust your own finances to the agent who has problems in controlling over their own finances.

• Age. In case you are thinking about your child as the attorney-in-fact, you should consider the age. There are differences on every state of laws on creating the power of attorney. However approximately all of the laws accept that no agent must be under 18 or 21 years old.

• Work experience. It's good idea to award authority to agent who is competent and expertise in legal matters or in finances.

• Time. While deciding on the perfect agent to stand for you, at that time it is very vital to think about how much time they can provide in handling legal matters and financial.

• Location. It's advisable to consider agent who is not far from the property and the principal.

• Organization and documentation skills. The principal may perhaps require the attorney-in-fact to trace and correctly document the several transactions made whether it will be for personal, business or government purposes.

Other factor you should pay attention is how to decide the spouse as the attorney-in-fact. Nearly all military personnel will give the power of attorney to their spouses in case they are in battle. Other option is a close relative.

You do not always have to opt for a family member, you can decide on a non-relative attorney-in-fact. If the principal is slightly worried on giving many duties on one agent, then he or she may well find other co-agents. However you could do that only if the power attorney specifies the information or the limitation of the capabilities. Previous to making decision on agent in the power of attorney, the principal ought to talk to the agents first and ask them if they are keen to be agents.

When carrying out the task, no organizations will control the agent. It will just depend on the principal as well as principal's relatives to supervise if the agent is carrying out what is predetermined in the power of attorney.

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Sunday, March 1, 2015

Cover Your Bases With Estate Planning


Create a Will

As an original concept of estate planning, creating a will is a part of it. By writing a will, money and property are divided after someone's death. There is a living will, which relates to medical treatment and any procedures that must be adhered to in case the originator becomes extremely or deathly ill. Also, by taking responsibility for communicating--both properly and promptly--creates a more action oriented atmosphere that is destined to be organized, in comparison to no guidance for the future.

Issue Trusts

After someone's death, relatives and loved ones tend to be on end. In some cases, there are certain property rights and awards that must be issued out to these members. That is where a trust sets in. A trust is method of passing down funds to another, after one's death has occurred. There are many forms of a trust in action today; and they vary according to the specific needs of the person granting the initial trust (in most circumstances).

Power of Attorney

During estate planning, assigning a Power of Attorney is important. By addressing this issue, someone is nominated as the head honcho when you are not able. This applies to financial issues and personal matters (i.e. health).

Letter of Instruction

Moreover, a letter of instruction is another important document that must be created and developed. This kind of particular pass-down includes specific directives that your successors must adhere. In summary, a letter of instruction contains contact information (in the event of your death), which pertains to where important information, files, or safes are stored; and details that pertain to financial accounts, in addition to pass-downs about continuing activities.

Good Reasons for Estate Planning

When the responsibilities--of a grantor, etc.--are put into place, the numbers can be big, in relation to financial responsibilities, health decision leader, etc. As a result, governments and certain laws have been put into place, in order to assist families and associates passing things down. Before, without a will or any other lawful documentation, people and tribes had to go by what they were told, and what they had learned, while certain individuals were alive and/or on their deathbeds. Thereafter, conflict could occur because of possible misrepresentation, disbelief, and manipulative factors.

With that said, by attempting to be responsible and producing wills and trusts (estate planning), detrimental misguidance--concerning responsibilities--should be null if any. Ultimately, It is always a good idea to tinker with estate planning; cover your bases, before you are out for the count.

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