Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Do Not Wait Until It Is Too Late! Set Up A Durable Power Of Attorney While You Still Can

Many things in life need to be decided in advance, but none more so than durable power of attorney. Why is this legal document so important? Because in it you indicate who will handle your finances and make decisions for you while you are of sound mind and body, or should you become mentally or physically incapacitated. This trusted individual is known as your agent.

Once you have decided to arrange for a durable power of attorney, how do you choose your agent? Since this individual will be stepping into your shoes to undertake as many or as few of your financial and property matters as you decide, you must choose someone whom you trust absolutely, who has the ability to manage money, and is at least 18 years of age.

Moreover, you must set up a durable power of attorney while you still have the mental capacity to sign a legal document and to make decisions for yourself. Once you can no longer do this, it is too late to give anyone else the authority to do so. Your wishes regarding bank accounts, financial transactions or real estate dealings could be largely ignored or unknown.

Normally people choose a trusted family member, spouse, friend or legal advisor for their agent. What is crucial to note here is that if you would like your spouse to manage your affairs in circumstances foreseen and unforeseen, you must arrange in advance for him or her to have a durable power of attorney. Lingering in the mind of the public is the misperception that your spouse can automatically sign documents for you if you are mentally or physically incapacitated, but this is not the case.

One of the great benefits of the durable power of attorney instrument is its flexibility and convenience. When your durable power of attorney takes effect and the powers that you grant your agent can be as broad or as narrow as you choose.

For example, you can be completely competent to manage all your affairs, but choose to give your agent power immediately because you would like him or her to act on your behalf if you are on vacation, out of the country, or sick. For a couple who moves to Florida to retire, it is much more convenient to have their New Jersey-based son, who is their agent, sell their New Jersey home.

By the same token, you can grant your agent power that becomes effective only in the future, whether you remain competent to handle your own affairs, or not. In either case, the powers that you grant your agent are completely up to you and can encompass as many or as few tasks as you designate.
Some of the powers that you can give your agent include the authority to sign checks, make deposits, pay bills, file tax returns, make health decisions (the subject of another article), sell property, or invest money.

You can also empower your agent to hire individuals to manage your business and personal matters, whether it is as simple as lawn mowing or as complex as investment advising. The only restriction is that your agent cannot write and sign a will for you, and his or her powers become void upon your death. Whatever powers you designate, you can also revoke at any time.

How is a durable power of attorney different from a power of attorney that is not durable, and why is appointing a durable power of attorney so much more important to your future? If you were to grant a non-durable power of attorney to your agent, it would only become effective only upon your showing signs of mental incapacitation.This means that if you are physically incapacitated, your agent does not have the authority to act upon your behalf.

As the following example shows, a non-durable power of attorney is not at all flexible.

When an elderly widower was hospitalized and physically incapacitated for several weeks, he was unable to rollover a CD and pay the premium on his life insurance policy in time.

Because he had previously arranged for his daughter to have a non-durable power of attorney only, she could not carry out either of these tasks for him. She was neither able to take advantage of a new CD offer with a better rate, nor was she able to prevent the life insurance policy from lapsing. Had the father arranged for his daughter to have a durable power of attorney, she would have been able to act on his behalf in both of these matters.

Finally, a durable power of attorney is much more affordable than the alternative: setting up a guardianship. If you have already planned for a comprehensive, durable power of attorney, and you become mentally incapacitated, the need for a guardianship is obviated. Establishing up a guardianship can take months of court time and medical testimony, as well as costing thousands of dollars.

Ultimately, it is up to you and your lawyer to decide how to best ensure that your affairs, whether in the present or the future, are managed according to your wishes. A well planned durable power of attorney can do just that.

Nicholas Giuditta is a trust and estates lawyer in Cranford, NJ. He prepares estate plans for high net worth individuals that protect their loved ones and preserve their assets. Find out how your family can benefit by visiting
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Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Estate Planning : When Does the Trust Stay Private?

Often revocable living trusts can help heirs avoid probate court, and affairs can remain private. Find out when a trust stays private from an estate planning and probate lawyer in this free video on estate law.

Monday, April 27, 2015

Jeffrey Volosin Discusses The Difference Between LLC And C Corps for Businesses

As being a part of the business world, it is important to understand different terms. Educating oneself on these terms not only helps with learning and understanding business conversation, but lets people know that the businessman (or woman) is serious and truly knowledgeable in the field. The two terms professionals should be able to know are a limited liability company (LLC) and a C corporation. While they are both structures, they both have their different traits and can allow many businessmen and businesswomen know what is most suitable for a business. Both have an indefinite term of life, but LLCs having plenty of distinguishing traits.

A limited liability company (better known as an LLC) is a specific type of business entity that mixes the personal liability protection of a corporation with the tax benefits of a partnership. It is a structure that offers protection to a company's owner. An LLC is best suited for small businesses with very few shareholders.

A limited liability company's taxation is a single taxation, which means the interests of the profit or loss is passed to members who are in the top 39.6% bracket. An LLC has the option to elect to be taxed as a corporation. Only the members own and manage an LLC. It has limited liability. In other words, the liability is not exceeded by the amount invested by members. Meetings for members are not required, but activities should be recorded.

A C corporation is a complete opposite. It is a specific type of business entity that is taxed separate from its owners. It is used for medium and large-sized corporations and owned by its shareholders; this is different from an LLC since LLCs deal with small businesses with a few shareholders. C corporations are managed by officers while LLCs are managed by the members or managing members themselves.

Another trait of C corporations is that it uses a double taxation in lieu of a single taxation that is seen in LLCs. Income is taxed roughly 34% and shareholders pay taxes on profits distributed. The choice of taxation structures are not allowed with C corporations, they must be taxed at a corporate tax rate. Shareholders are required to attend board meetings whereas stated for LLCs, meetings are not required. While these differences may be broad between the two types of corporate structures, knowing the differences allows professionals to make the right assessments for future businesses.

If you are looking for more information on incorporating your small business, please visit to get find out more.
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Sunday, April 26, 2015

Reasons Why Making a Will Is Important

Most people tend to procrastinate about making their last will and testament, primarily because it is a harsh reminder of our mortality and as such, we prefer not to have anything to do with it until the time comes when it is too late to do something about it. In most funerals you attend, you often hear people ask if the deceased left any will and the most common answer being "no" or "none."

While making a will is certainly no one's favorite thing to do, what many people don't realize is that it can alleviate your fears of death because once you decide to make it, you will be assured that the loved ones you leave behind will be taken care of properly and that your estate won't be spent on legal expenses from contests initiated by your heirs.

However, that's not to say you can't die without ever making a will. In fact, there are two ways by which you can die without a will, the first being because you never wrote one and the second being, the will you wrote was declared invalid by probate court. In both cases, this is referred to as dying intestate or dying without a valid will.

When you die intestate, that means the control of your property and the distribution of your assets will be done under the laws of intestacy. If for example you co-owned a property with two other people, the laws of intestacy dictate that the ownership will not transfer to the other co-owners but your heirs, which is one situation that the remaining co-owners may contest.

There are four types of assets where these laws don't apply and they are as follows:

  • Life insurance and retirement plan proceeds
  • Properties that are jointly owned with a right of survivorship
  • Properties held in a living trust
  • Properties under the community property system

The entire purpose of making a will is to make sure your property and assets are distributed to people and organizations as you intended. To make sure this happens you can elect an executor of your will to make sure every condition in your will is fulfilled. Choosing an executor means you should choose someone you trust like a relative or a close friend. If you don't have neither to choose from, then it should be someone who is dependable, trustworthy, well-organized, good with paperwork and diligent about meeting deadlines.

And lastly, making a will doesn't have to follow a strict guideline because what will matter is not how the will was written but the conditions written within. There are many ways these days to write your own will, such as software that you can use just by asking you a few questions where your answers will be inserted into a ready-made will. Having a will ready will also save you from having to hire a lawyer to help you write one - not only is it time-consuming to find a good lawyer, it is also quite expensive to have one draft your will for you.

When you want to learn more about how to avoid problems after you've gone, check out this post about will disputes so that your loved ones are well taken care of when it matters.
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Saturday, April 25, 2015

Friday, April 24, 2015

Should You Include Your Spouse When Forming a Small Business LLC?

In this video it talks about a couple of reasons why you may not want to have your spouse included in your LLC. But every situation is different.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Estate Planning Eases Confusion, Financial Worries

What you need to know about estate planning, including why having a will and assigning a power of attorney is crucial.

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

How to Choose the Right Business Structure

By reviewing the pros and cons of these four common business structures, you can determine which one will benefit you most.

Monday, April 20, 2015

Uncontested Divorce - Definition, Terms and Conditions

An Uncontested Divorce is a legal procedure in which the spouses mutually agree on certain terms and conditions, in order to adjourn their marriage. An uncontested divorce can be executed successfully if the spouses comply to a shared agreement in the matters related to the property partition, financial matters, any kind of support activities related to their children, and other litigious affairs.

A major benefit of consenting with an uncontested divorce is that unlike contested divorce, it doesn't have to deal with emotional and financial issues, is relatively inexpensive and quick, since most of the times the spouses may not find any need of an attorney or a court case for the divorce, if they are in good terms with each other, and plan to go with proper understanding. This is quite helpful essentially when the couple has much less assets to deal with and no children.

There are many "Do it yourself" forms available at concerned regulatory agencies, which can assist you in going ahead with the uncontested divorce activity yourself, without the need of any outside legal authority or attorney.But, in case of the issues for child support or the partition of community property, one must follow up with attorney related to divorce, before they proceed with signing off any legal documents.

Divorce is a quite tedious and sometimes displeasing procedure.Despite having mutual consent on many of the terms, there still exist loads of matters that need to be taken care of, before ending up the marriage. The couple needs to be capable enough to distinguish these issues and resolve them as soon as they can. To decide whether it is appropriate for a couple to go ahead with an uncontested divorce rather than a contested one, there are certain points that can be used as reference:

1) Are both the spouses agreeing to go for a divorce, or one of them still wants to re-establish the relationship?

2) Are all the financial issues, modes of income and other related assets properly understood by both the spouses, so that they can divide and decide on them accordingly?

3) In case, there are children, are all the issues regarding the child care and support,custody, periodic meetings and visits decided yet?

4) Are all the issues getting settled with mutual consent, and are devoid of any hard feelings?

5) Are both the partners in accord with the honesty or authenticity of the other partner's notions,regarding the resolution of these issues?

If either of the above mentioned questions, has an answer as "yes", then it is appropriate to go for an uncontested divorce.

Uncontested divorce can be carried on easily and without much hassles, but they can be derogatory to certain individuals in case the people involved in the divorce, do not know much about their appropriate rights with respect to the alimony amount, partition of pension, earnings from real estate, and other modes of income.

Hence, it is always advisable to consult an attorney or other legal authorities related to divorce, even while going on with the uncontested divorce, where you and your partner mutually agree to all the terms.
Uncontested Divorce.
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Saturday, April 18, 2015

Friday, April 17, 2015

Ever Considered an LLC?

There are no hard and fast rules as to what is the best way to structure a business, and naturally, the decision will be based on your own individual circumstances. But there are certain pros and cons to each business structure that you should be aware of, as there are certain rules that regulate the way business may be conducted in the U. S.

Strategy - Consider converting your business to a Limited Liability Company to avoid personal exposure to business liability.

Sole Proprietorship and Partnerships do not offer owner(s) protection from business debts, whereas Corporations do.

For this reason alone, you should consider forming your business entity as a Corporation - to provide the owner(s) "1st Level" protection from business creditors. Of course, this only applies to debt that has not been "personally guaranteed" by any business owners.

This same level of protection can also be accomplished, without incorporation, using a "Limited Liability Company" (LLC). A "Limited Liability Company" is taxed as a partnership form of organization-using a Form 1065, (or as a corporation, using a Corporate Tax form) and issuing K-l (Form 1065) Schedules to each owner.

This is the newest method of structuring a business and is a fairly recent innovation. An LLC is like a Sole Proprietorship; however it provides the same protection from liabilities as that of a "C" or "S" corporation. In fact, this structure allows you to elect to be treated as a corporation without having to deal with the formalities of a corporation.

If there is only one owner, you can file and be taxed as a Sole Proprietorship. If there are two or more owners, you will be taxed as a partnership.

Here's why you may want to consider using the LLC form of business organization.


· Limits liability just like a regular corporation.

· One person can own the LLC, which eliminates the need to file a separate tax return.

· Other entities such as a C Corp, trust, or partnership can own an LLC.

· Does not require the formal meetings and documentation of a "C" or "S" corporation.

· Tax filing and other paper work is simple and inexpensive.

· You can claim all the same tax advantages of Sole Proprietorship and partnerships.You don't have to hold shareholder meetings or keep meeting notes.

· Management control need not be proportional to ownership.

The advantages of a "Limited Liability Company" over an "S" Corporation form of business organization are as follows:

· An "LLC" is not limited to 100 owners;

· An "LLC" allows foreign individuals to be owners, and

· An "LLC" cannot have its status revoked if it engages in real estate activities.


· The major disadvantage of an LLC is that it does not provide a FICA tax break like an "S Corporation" does (except in the case of hiring a spouse or children... their salary is not subject to FICA taxes if they are under the age 18).

· The laws which govern an LLC are not uniformly written among the states. Because there is no uniformity between states with regard to the tax treatment of an "LLC", there may exist some potential for exposure to additional liability at your local and/or state level.

Under a "Limited Liability Company" its owners are not called owners or partners, but rather are referred to as "members." Each member enjoys an upper limit on their own personal liability potential in an amount equal to the dollars they personally invested in the "LLC"-just like the liability protection afforded "S" Corporation shareholders.

One final thought on multiple ownerships within partnerships, LLC's or corporations. What happens if you and one other owner in your business do not get along? Bad relationships have resulted in some of the most expensive and protracted legal battles around. This kind of business contention is as bad as a divorce.

Thus, take the following advice:

If you incorporate or structure your business as an LLC and have multiple owners, always set up a "buy-sell" agreement at the launch of your business. This will eliminate a lot of problems you could encounter later. Think of "buy-sell" arrangements as some sort of business prenuptial agreement.

As I have already noted, the way you formally structure your business can protect you from liabilities and save you thousands of tax dollars depending on your personal circumstances. I strongly recommend that you seek out the professional help of your accountant or attorney in order to sort out the issues with each of these entities.
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Thursday, April 16, 2015

Business Laws : Forming an LLC

Forming a LLC, or limited liability company, requires contacting the Small Business Administration to find out what type of licenses and registrations are needed to be filed.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Probate - By The People

If you are having to go through the Probate Process with the court, let BY THE PEOPLE help.

We may be able to assist you in representing yourself, by preparing the documents needed, filing the paperwork with the court, setting court dates, arranging for publication, and many other steps needed to complete the process.

Our fees are 1% of the value of the estate (up to $3,500.00). Any fees for the courts, probate referee, publication will be extra.

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Wills Vs. Trusts: Suze Orman

Finance expert Suze Orman discusses the differences between a will and a trust and why both are important to have.

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Documents to Consider When Doing Estate Planning

There's nothing that can prevent someone from dying, since physical death is an absolute certainty that no one can escape. The fear for some people, though, is not what's going to happen to them after they pass on, but more on who's going to take care of their loved ones, especially if the people he'll be leaving behind are either very young children or are incapacitated, or both.

You can't have control of what's going to happen to you after death, but you sure can decide what's going to happen to your assets once that event transpires. It's called estate planning. This is the process by which a person (or even a family) arranges the transfer of his assets in anticipation of his death. And in estate planning, there are several documents to consider. Here are some of them:

Last will and testament - This document takes front and center in all the planning. This is the document that legally provides for the transfers of assets after one's death. It names a person to settle the estate, a trustee who will administer any trust established, and a guardian if there minor children. For those who die without having executed a will, they are considered to be 'intestate.' Under certain laws, if one is intestate, property goes first (or in major part) to a spouse, and then to children and their descendants.

Trust - Persons preparing a will and testament can execute either 'inter vivos' or testamentary trusts (trusts established through a will). The difference between the two is that with the former, assets are transferred into the living during the trust creator's lifetime, as opposed to testamentary trusts, where the transfer becomes operative at the time of death.

Durable powers of attorney - A power of attorney is the document that authorizes a designated agent to carry out financial and business transactions for the person that's establishing the document. This grants such agent to access bank accounts (and even brokerage accounts), deal with insurance companies, and even sell property. This effectively allows the agent to step into the shoes of the person he is assisting.

Healthcare power of attorney - This document is a form of a living will that is designed, among other things, to: provide instructions for the conditions should life-sustaining procedures be utilized, authorize who will make healthcare decisions, and ensure that the person chosen to make these decisions is given access to the executor's medical records during incapacity.

These are the important documents to take into account so a person can have the opportunity to make personal and financial decisions, both in life and after death, without the need for court orders.

Estate planning deals with certain legal issues, which makes it important for an individual to get the services of a lawyer while doing it. You can get attorneys estate planning at ClinchLongLetherbarrow.
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Saturday, April 11, 2015

How to Become Someone's Power of Attorney

Becoming someone's power of attorney allows a person to make financial or legal decisions for another person if that person cannot make their own decisions.

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Different Types of Power of Attorney

Although power of attorney is essentially handing control of your affairs over to another person, there are different uses of the position which vary depending on the situation. These largely depend on the reason behind power of attorney being transferred from the 'principal', the individual who wishes to relinquish control of their affairs, and the 'attorney-at-fact', the person who takes control of the principal's business and legal dealings.

Non-Durable POA

Non-durable power of attorney is used for short-term transactions, which for whatever reason the principal cannot handle themselves. Any such power of attorney that is non-durable has an expiration, primarily when the principal becomes incapacitated for some reason and is no longer able to give permission for the power of attorney to continue, nor can they revoke it. Usually, non durable power of attorney is limited to a specific time frame, in which any particular deal that is needed to be completed is given time to be dealt with. When this particular instance is complete, power returns to the principal.

Non-durable POA is effective immediately.

Durable POA

This type of power of attorney is similar to non-durable power of attorney, only it continues in the event that the principal becomes incapacitated or mentally ill. All powers of attorney come to an end when the principal dies, but durable power of attorney continues right up to that point. Power of attorney that is durable is often used in terminally ill cases, where the principal asks their attorney-at-fact to allow any lifesaving equipment to be removed or authorize a Do Not Resuscitate

Durable POA is effective immediately.

Springing POA

Springing power of attorney is used in cases where the principal cannot actively give permission, either verbally or in writing, for someone to act as their attorney-at-fact. To obtain springing power of attorney, a doctor must certify that the principal is incapable of thinking for themselves and an attorney-in-fact is required. Springing power of attorney is used predominantly in cases of sudden deterioration of health, such as deterioration of a mental illness or a serious accident.

These are the three main types of power of attorney, governing time and how the power is assigned. However, power of attorney does not have to be granted for all of the principal's affairs - it can sometimes only apply to one aspect, such as financial. The differences are as follows:

Special or Limited POA

Predominantly used with non-durable power of attorney, special or limited power of attorney is used for specific cases. It often just applies to financial dealings or a specific property sale, and though an attorney-in-fact is appointed, they have no control over any aspect of the principal's life apart from the sector they are charged with.

Any other type of POA is called General Attorney, which applies to all affairs and dealings of the principal.

Health Care POA

This is a specific power of attorney that is used for those who are terminally or mentally ill, and gives the attorney-in-fact power over medical decisions but nothing more. It is similar to special attorney, though is specifically used for medicinal purposes.

Disclaimer: This article is for informational and entertainment purposes only, and should not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter. is a complete online resource that compares the legal services offered by various online companies. Find the best company for your general power of attorney needs at
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Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Estate Planning : Purpose of a Living Will

A living will, or advance directive, gives a named person the ability to 'pull the plug' in some medical instances. Learn the purpose of a living will from an estate planning and probate lawyer in this free video on estate law.

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Setting Up an LLC - The Benefits and Steps of a Limited Liability Company

A limited liability company (which is commonly abbreviated as LLC) offers limited liability to its owners as a legal form of business company in the United States. Many small business owners are drawn to this type of business formation because it offers limited liability for the actions and debts of the company. This type of business formation excludes personal liability from the general debts and other obligations of the company and limits the liability of the owners to the extent of their equity. An LLC has characteristics of both a partnership and corporation; the primary partnership characteristic is the availability of pass-through income taxation while the primary corporate characteristic is limited liability.

Many entrepreneurs choose to setup an LLC for tax reasons. LLCs avoid "double taxation" because the income of the LLC itself is not taxed at the company level. Instead, taxes on profits and deductions of losses are computed at the individual level on the personal tax return of each LLC member (owner). LLC owners can elect for the IRS to tax the LLC as a sole proprietorship, partnership, C Corporation, or S Corporation. Owners make this election through the IRS after the company forms with the state.

After setting up an LLC, the bottom-line profit of the business is not considered to be earned income to the members, and therefore is not subject to self-employment tax. But it is still important to consider that the managing member's share of the overall profit of the LLC is considered earned income, and is subject to self-employment tax.

Members of an LLC are compensated using either guaranteed payments or distributions of profit. Guaranteed payments represent earned income to the members, which qualifies them to enjoy the benefits of tax-favored fringe benefits. A distribution of profit allows each member to pay themselves by merely writing checks. However, as a member of an LLC, you are not allowed to pay yourself wages.

Another important perk of setting up an LLC is that the managing member of an LLC can deduct 100 percent of the health insurance premiums he pays, up to the extent of their pro-rata share of the LLC's net profit.

The basic steps to setting up an LLC are fairly simple:

Step 1: Find a copy of the LLC Articles of Organization Form for your state. This is usually located at the Secretary of State's office. It is also a good idea to check there are any rules concerning business names in your state.

Step 2: Choose a name for your business. Almost any name will work so long as it is not the same or deceptively similar to a name being used by another entity that is filed with the State Filing Office which is usually the Secretary of State's Office. The name must end with the words Limited Liability Company or an abbreviation such as LLC or L.L.C. The ending such as LLC or Inc is not considered part of the name when searching for availability.

Step 3: Complete and File the Articles of Organization form with the State Filing Office. The State Filing Office where you turn in the form is usually the Secretary of State where you are required to pay a filing fee. The Articles of Organization form is a relatively simple document that includes the name of your business, its purpose, office address, the registered agent who will receive legal documents, and the names of each initial member of your proposed LLC. A registered agent is simply a person or incorporated company who can accept service of legal papers if your company is sued or the person who can receive mail from the State Filing Office. You can act as your own registered agent, however, the address you use must be a street address and not a P.O. Box. The address is important to make sure you receive papers that are served or sent to your company.

Step 4: Submit a notice to your local newspaper for publishing. This step is sometimes required by your state, you may want to check to make sure. Some states even require this step to be done before filing your Articles of Organization form. This notice should detail your intention to setup an LLC.

Step 5: Prepare and Sign an Operating Agreement. This is not required by the state but is a very important step in maintaining your liability protection and preventing disagreements between the members. The Operating Agreement is an essential document which sets forth the rights, duties and obligations of each member of the LLC. It also usually sets the ownership percentages between the members, the division of profits and the distribution of income. This document can also strengthen your liability protection by demonstrating that you have completed the organization of the company and are in compliance with the process.

The State Filing Office usually does not provide Operating Agreements, this will be something that you have to come up with. Many people use online services such as, and other people go further and hire attorneys which can be much more expensive.

Step 6: Obtain an Employer ID Number (EIN) from the IRS. As a separate legal entity, your LLC requires its own federal tax identification number from the IRS. This can sometimes be avoided if an LLC is owned by only one person, in which case the person has the option of reporting taxes on his own social security number. To get the Employer ID Number you can acquire from SS-4 from most post offices and then file it with the IRS.

Step 7: Setup a Separate Bank Account for the LLC. A separate legal entity requires a separate bank account. It is important that you do not co-mingle your funds between business and personal bank accounts. The courts will look at this if you were to ever get sued.

Step 8: Document Ownership Interest Percentages of the LLC. To avoid disputes and ownership conflicts in the future, it is important to assign ownership percentages when the company is first formed. This step is not necessarily required, but it would be very wise.

Thomas Rogers is a legal expert and regularly contributes to Setting up LLC which helps people streamline the LLC filing process. The site allows you to setup your LLC through the internet which can help you save a lot of time and money. If you are a small business owner who is overwhelmed by the procedure of incorporating your business, please do not hesitate to visit us. Find more information at
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Sunday, April 5, 2015

Naming Of Guardianship In Wills

When there are minor children, a Will should always be used to name a guardian(s) of their persons and property. This guardian is who will be taking care of them in your absence and will also have control over their finances, both from you and for their well being. This guardian that you appoint, needless to say, is someone that you must be able to trust completely with your children and someone who will make sure that they are cared for in the way that you have planned. This person "can" of course be someone other than your X.

Alternate guardians should also be named in the even that the original guardian is for whatever reason unable to assume responsibility. Naming of guardians and alternates should not be done any other way but in a Will. This will relieve any hint of confusion after you are not able to take care of your kids yourself. Of course, if there is a surviving parent that person will be automatically named guardian if living in the same household; but, if your will specifies a different person to control the money, then this can fit your goals quite nicely.

This situation can and often gets tricky in divorce cases. Since you are divorced, the parent with legal custody of the child(ren) should designate a guardian. If you are the legal guardian, then you have the authority to designate who will care for your children after you die. Understand, however, that if somebody besides the other biological parent is named, this decision might not be binding.

When a custodial parent dies, the non-custodial parent always has priority in seeking guardianship and custody, unless that person is deemed unfit to perform the duties necessary or is unsafe to leave with children. If you are set against your "X" getting custody of your children if you were to die, you need to make sure that you or your appointed guardian will be able to prove that your "X" is unfit or unable to perform the job.

However, be aware that the court will probably have to approve who you have proposed to be the legal guardian eventually even if named in your Will. The purpose of your Will in this regard, though, is to guide the court in its judgment. It will also help avoid family arguments over who is better qualified to raise your children and will give the person you choose the authority over all others.

Dennis Gac is widely known as "The World's premier fathers rights Consultant!" But why would you care? Well, I'll tell you if you rush over to his site... I think you'll come to your own conclusion that he "IS" the real deal! Experience someone who works and thinks outside the box for you! Read what others have to say at
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Saturday, April 4, 2015

Making A Living Will Impacts End Of Life Care

New research by Lauren Nicholas at University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research shows that making a living will impacts the end of life care of individuals. This is the first national study involving sample from across the US.

Friday, April 3, 2015

Estate Planning : Family Estate Trust or Revocable Living Trust?

Most people who ask for family estate trusts really want a revocable living trust to reduce estate taxes and manage finances.

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Estate Planning : The Probate Process Explained

The probate process can be a headache when estates are not planned well. Uncover the probate process with an estate planning and probate lawyer in this free video on estate law.