Monday, October 16, 2017

How to Form an LLC - A Simple, Straightforward Guide


Forming an LLC (Limited Liability Company) is not as complicated as most people think. While each state has its own unique list of steps and requirements, you'll find that they have the important things in common. So whether you're establishing your LLC in business-friendly Delaware or in rural Wyoming, it's likely that you'll need to go through the following steps if you want to form an LLC:

1. Choose a business name.

It helps to have a short list of possible business names to choose from before you register your LLC. Some of the business names you want may already be taken, or they might violate a trademark. Don't worry too much about this, though. Most states have a searchable database online where you can see if the business name you want is already being used. Also, remember that your business name must be followed with a designator identifying it as an LLC. Some valid ones include "Limited Liability Company", "Limited Company", "Ltd. Liability Co." and the acronym "LLC".

Once you've selected a valid name for your LLC, don't worry about registering it. Usually, it will automatically be registered once you complete the second step.

2. File your Articles of Organization.

Simply put, your LLC's Articles of Organization is a document containing basic business information such as your business name, address, purpose, and the names of the owners. This is often a ready-made form that you can get from your Secretary of State's office. While you're at this step, it also helps to ask them about the fees and requirements involved in setting up an LLC. This will help you plan for the later steps.

As you file your Articles of Organization, you will be required to pay a filing fee. This is usually inexpensive, but if you want the filing to be expedited you will have to pay a few hundred dollars more. Keep in mind that some states have additional fee requirements. For example, LLC owners in California are also asked to pay $800 in business tax on filing, to be repaid annually.

3. Create an Operating Agreement.

Though operating agreements are not required in all states, it's handy to have them from the start - especially if the LLC will be owned by more than one person. Your LLC's operating agreement should contain information about the role of each owner, how profits and losses will be shared, as well as the operating rules and bylaws of the business.

4. Submit other miscellaneous requirements.

Since business laws vary from state to state, there are probably specific requirements you need to submit depending on where you're establishing your LLC and what kind of LLC you have. For example, if you're starting a business that sells and distributes liquor, you'd need a specific liquor license for that. Other requirements may include zoning permits, publishing a classified ad announcing your LLC, and practice permits for specific professions.

As you can see, it's really simple to set up your own LLC. All you need to do is to follow the steps above while being aware of the unique documents and fees required by your state.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Spencer_Holt/536370

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Saturday, October 14, 2017

Why You Need a Durable Power of Attorney Now!


Planning for unfortunate events such as serious illness or injury is rarely on anyone's list of favorite pastimes. Sometimes, though, enduring the small discomfort that may accompany preparing for the unexpected will avoid untold anguish on the part of your family and friends. This is certainly the case with the Durable Power of Attorney, an often simple document that becomes so very important if sickness or injury renders you unable to take care of your own affairs.

Power of Attorney Defined

A Power of Attorney is a document in which you (as the "Principal") allow someone else (the "Agent" or "Attorney-in-fact") to act legally on your behalf. The Power of Attorney may be limited to very specific actions that the Agent is authorized to take on your behalf. On the other hand it may give the Agent very broad powers. In either event, the Agent you appoint in the Power of Attorney should be someone that you trust without reservation. That could be a family member, an advisor, a trustworthy friend or a bank or similar institution.

The "Durable" Power of Attorney

The significance of having a "Durable" Power of Attorney is best understood if you know what can happen with the plain old garden variety of Power of Attorney.

If you sign a Power of Attorney that is not "durable," the document remains effective only while you are alive and competent to handle your own affairs. If you become incompetent or die, the Power of Attorney is automatically revoked by law and your Agent is no longer able to act on your behalf. This prevents a Power of Attorney from becoming irrevocable inadvertently, and, until recent times, it was the only way a Power of Attorney could be prepared.

The non-durable Power of Attorney has limited usefulness for family and estate planning purposes, though, because the Power of Attorney is often most needed when you have become incapacitated! That is when you really need someone else that is able to make legal decisions or take other actions on your behalf.

All fifty states now permit the use of a "durable" Power of Attorney that is not revoked simply because the Principal becomes incapacitated or mentally incompetent. This makes the Durable Power of Attorney a far more reliable document, particularly for family and estate planning purposes, since you may now authorize your Agent to act on your behalf even after illness, injury or other cause has rendered you unable to manage your own affairs. Even with a Durable Power of Attorney, however, the Principal's death causes an immediate revocation of the document and termination of the powers that are given to the Agent.

A Matter of Convenience

The Durable Power of Attorney is often used as a matter of convenience.

Suppose, for example, you have your home listed for sale. You have also planned a long awaited trip to visit Aunt Trixie in Deadwood, South Dakota, and you are concerned that an interested buyer may come along while you are on the road. A Durable Power of Attorney would be handy here to appoint someone you trust to act in your absence to negotiate the sale and sign any documents that are needed to make the deal binding.

The Durable Power of Attorney could be prepared so that it is effective only until the date you plan to return from your trip, and it might describe specific terms that your Agent must include in the sale, such as the minimum sale price that is acceptable to you.

A Matter of Protecting Loved Ones

What happens if, from illness, injury or another cause, you become physically or mentally incapacitated to the point that you are no longer able to handle your own legal affairs?

Let's suppose again that while you are incapacitated it becomes necessary to mortgage your home to pay your medical bills. Who will sign the mortgage? Even if your home is jointly owned with your spouse, he cannot obtain a mortgage without your signature.

In those circumstances it would be necessary to request the local probate court to appoint a guardian for you that has the power to handle your legal affairs. In many states, this type of guardian is referred to as a "conservator". Included in the conservator's powers might be the power to borrow money and sign a mortgage on your behalf making it possible to obtain the funds needed to pay the medical bills.

However, you may have heard that it is advantageous to avoid probate whenever possible, particularly if there is a good alternative available. The delay and expense associated with probate proceedings and the fact that they are conducted in the probate court, a public forum, make that good advice in most circumstances. And there is a better alternative than probate, but it requires you to act before the incapacity arises - you need to sign a Durable Power of Attorney.

When used in this estate planning context, the Durable Power of Attorney is generally worded very broadly to give your Agent the power to step into your legal shoes in almost any circumstance. In effect, you tell your Agent "You can do anything I can do."

Now, if you have prepared the Durable Power of Attorney and then become incapacitated, no one has to go through a probate proceeding to appoint a guardian or conservator to act for you - you have already given your Agent the power to do so. As you can see, the Durable Power of Attorney can save precious time and expense in critical situations and avoid having your personal affairs become the subject of a public proceeding.

Appointing a Successor Agent

It is often a good idea to appoint one or more successor Agents. The Agent you appoint in your Durable Power of Attorney may die or for some other reason become unable or unwilling to act as your Agent. In that case, you may be left without someone to act for you when you most need that assistance.

Appointing successors to your first choice of Agent helps insure that someone is always available to handle your affairs. Of course, each successor that you appoint should be someone that has your complete trust.

Revoking a Power of Attorney

As long as you are competent, you have the power to revoke your Durable Power of Attorney. To do so, send written notice to your Agent notifying him or her that the document has been revoked. Once the Agent has notice of your revocation, the Agent may take no further action under the Durable Power of Attorney. However, your revocation will not undo any permissible actions that the Agent has taken prior to being notified that the Power of Attorney has been terminated.

You must also notify third parties with whom your Agent has been dealing that the Durable Power of Attorney has been revoked. For example, if the Agent has been dealing with a stockbroker, you must notify the stockbroker as soon as possible. Do this in writing, as well, and do it immediately. Third parties who do not receive notice of the revocation are entitled to, and probably will, continue to rely on the Durable Power of Attorney.

Making the Durable Power of Attorney Effective upon Incapacity.

It is possible to have a Durable Power of Attorney that only becomes effective if and when you become incapacitated. This document is referred as a "springing" Durable Power of Attorney because it "springs to life" on the occurrence of a future event - your incapacity. The document should include a detailed definition of "disability" to make clear the circumstances in which your Agent may act on your behalf.

Knowing that your Agent is unable to exercise his or her powers until you are actually unable to do so yourself may make using the Durable Power of Attorney more comfortable for you. Unfortunately, even with a good definition of incapacity in the springing Durable Power of Attorney, your Agent may find that third parties are simply not willing to make the judgment that you are indeed disabled. If they are wrong, they may be held liable to you for any damages that you sustain as a result of the error in judgment. You may therefore find the springing document cannot be relied upon in all circumstances.

Don't Procrastinate!

Estate planning is easy to put off. But don't! Advance planning, such as executing a Durable Power of Attorney, may make a horrible circumstance for you and your family just a bit more bearable.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=John_Pollock

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Friday, October 13, 2017

3 Positive Points of Starting an LLC


When you start a business you will have to sift through the variety of options that are available to you in terms of running a full scale operation. Even if you're the only person working within the framework of a company, you will still need to file paperwork with your state and city governments, and you will need to have a good plan of action. Sure, you could just go into business and wait for the penalties to pile up and then form a legitimate business, or you could look into the proper way to go about starting an LLC. The latter is far better in many people's views, and will definitely save you headaches later on. Consider the following positive points of starting an LLC.

Multiple Owners or One Owner - Whether you have a great deal of investors that want to be part owners or you are alone in the process you will find that an LLC allows you to run your company with a great deal of freedom. Not only that, you will be able to include others in a management or even ownership capacity later on as long as you have an operation document that will showcase your ideas moving forward.

Liability - The best part of starting an LLC is that you will not be liable for a great variety of issues that will come up. For instance, let's assume that you have a client that is hell bent on suing you, and so they sue the business that you own and you have to go to court. If you file your paperwork properly, and you lose the case, you will only be liable for the money that is held within your business, and nothing else! That means if you own a home, a boat, a car or just about anything that is not part of the business proper, you could stand to lose nothing on a personal level. This is a great thing because you can protect your assets and not worry about what some might do to try and get your money.

Taxes - Dealing with taxes can be quite easy because they flow into personal income taxes in many ways. You will find that you will have to deal with your taxes in a manner that is a bit more simple than starting a larger company or a different option in terms of business. While it's not a matter of not paying your fair share, it's really a matter of ease when tax time comes around.

The above 3 positive points when starting an LLC are just 3 items that many find to be great. There are a number of other integral points to consider and each one seems to make the formation of this type of company a bit better than others. Only you can decide what path your business takes, but when it comes to starting something away from the traditional route of 40 hour work weeks, this is definitely one of the more attractive options. You'll find that it's easier than others, and it can bring amazing profits in time.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Pete_Morgan/604971

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Thursday, October 12, 2017

Benefits of an LLC For Rental Property Owners


Rental property owners are entrepreneurs. And as entrepreneurs, their primary goal is to maximize profit. One of the most basic steps in maximizing profit is to minimize costs and other liabilities. Recently, the up and coming trend of protecting one's personal assets from the liabilities of a rental business is to set up an LLC over the rental properties. With this LLC, the rental property owner's personal property, like home, car and other assets, are protected from the unpredictable demands of owning rental property. There are also other benefits of an LLC for rental property owners.

Personal property protection

First of, what is an LLC? LLC stands for Limited Liability Company. Without the LLC, business owners are liable for damages and other losses from their business even with their own personal assets.

To illustrate, a sole-proprietor will have to pay for anything and everything that deals with his business out of his own pockets. He can never interpose that his business is bankrupt when he still maintains a personal bank account, his own car and his own home. His personal assets will have to answer for the deficiency. Corporate shareholders do not have this problem because they are protected by the law on corporations that shareholders are only liable for losses out of their corporate shares, hence, their personal property is protected and remains untouched by any corporate liability. The downside of forming a corporation though is that the process itself is meticulous and profits will have to be shared with a handful of shareholders.

LLC combines the ease of being a sole-proprietor with the potential of earning huge profits all by yourself and the protection to personal assets that corporations offer. Personal property protection is the most basic and primary of the benefits of an LLC for rental property owners.

Tax advantages

Another of the benefits of an LLC for rental property owners is the tax advantages. Has even better tax treatment than when in a corporation. A corporate shareholder in essence will have to pay taxes twice. First, when the corporation itself pays its taxes, and second when the shareholder has to pay his own tax from the income derived from the corporation. An LLC is not taxed as a separate entity. The property owner will only have to pay his taxes once, upon his receipt of the income from the rental property. Also, the net loss in the LLC can be declared as a personal deduction for the property owner!

Be a professional by name

Real estate laws require one to spend a certain number of hours in real estate activities to be called as professionals in the real estate industry. But being in an LLC, these requirements are cut in as much as half!

An LLC may be obtained for separate properties

Another of the great benefits of an LLC for rental property owners is that a different or separate LLC may be obtained for each and every property. Why is this beneficial? Because when an investment is sued covered by an LLC, all the properties belonging to that LLC will stand liable for the suit. Covering separate properties with separate LLCs will only make the specific property or investment liable for the claim it is sued for.

These are only the basic benefits of an LLC for rental property owners. And these are already enough to convince any serious business-minded property owner, what would a more detailed study of the benefits do? Start protecting your own personal property and increasing your profits all in the same time. Get an LLC now!


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Maria_Faith

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Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Power of Attorney - What Are the Options?


Business or personal matters often require giving power of attorney (abbreviated as POA) privileges to chosen individuals. POA authorizes the chosen individual to decide matters relating to finance or healthcare for another person who are not capable of deciding anything on his/her own.

Before giving such privileges to any person, you need to know how it works, as well as the rights given to that person. The person nominated for the purpose must be competent in making decisions, some of which may go against the wishes of other members of the family.

Law makes it obligatory to give POA only to persons who are at least eighteen years old. It is extremely important to select a person capable of taking difficult decisions relating to finance and health.

People can choose between different kinds of rights and responsibilities that they can transfer through a Power of Attorney form, depending on their needs. Every POA involves two persons, the 'Principal' and the 'Attorney-in-Fact.' The former is the individual who defines the contract, and the latter is an individual who executes the duties specified therein.

The most usual kind of contract is the Durable Power of Attorney. It's a legal document, authorizing the attorney-in-fact to take decisions concerning the finances and health, as stipulated by the Principal. This kind of POA remains in force till the Principal dies or revokes this act.

The other frequently made document is called the Non-Durable Power of Attorney. The attorney-in-fact to is authorized to take decisions for certain transactions, which are specified in the act. This kind of POA is usually made when the Principal needs to undergo surgery or another medical treatment that could make them unable for taking decisions. This POA is valid for a particular transaction, and automatically expires after the operation took place.

A Healthcare Power of Attorney is required while authorizing an individual for taking medical decisions for the Principal. It essentially involves discussing the types of treatments to which the principal may be subjected to.

The Limited Power of Attorney is generally given to another person for selling or transferring some Real Estate or property in the possession of the Principal. The privilege expires after the completion of the transaction.

Most do not feel comfortable discussing such topics. However, the kind of treatment to be followed should be discussed in advance, in case anything unexpected happens. For instance, if someone doesn't want to be kept on a life support system, when the brain is declared dead, he/she should specifically mention it in his/her healthcare POA. Else, the medical personnel is obliged to obey the state laws and continue with the regular medical treatment.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Cindy_Humphreys

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Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Over 100 Legal Document Services at By the People



Rene of By the People in Fairfield CA gives a short overview of their services and the number of legal documents they can help with. For questions, call Rene or Tammy at 707-428-9871 and you can visit their website at http://www.bythepeopleca.com

Monday, October 9, 2017

Understanding the Difference Between a Will and a Living Trust


When planning for the future of your children as you get older, there are a few options on how to pass on your assets such as property, life insurance, stocks, etc. The two major ways of stating and distributing your assets after your passing is with a living trust or will. When you hear the words trust fund or wills, it refers to estate planning. Although there are different trusts out there, the main one I will focus on is a living trust.

Will

A will is a document that is created to help distribute assets and properties to a beneficiary after one passes away. With a will, it will be submitted through a probate process, which is a court process. In this process, the courts will validate the will and ensure that all the instructions are followed properly while also repaying any creditors. The downfall to a will is that it becomes public so anyone can see the distribution of your assets to your selected beneficiaries. On top of not having privacy, it could take several months to even years for the court to sort everything out!

Living Trust

A living trust is a legal document that states three parties: Grantor/Trustor, Trustee, and Beneficiaries. The grantor/trustor is the individual or couple who establishes/creates the trust. The trustee is the person nominated to be in control of the trusts assets. In many cases, the trustee is the same as the grantor/trustor. Beneficiaries are those at the receiving end who will benefit from the trust. A trust is beneficial to most people who have property worth $100,000+ and/or those who have large amounts of assets. In certain states, properties at $100,000+ can be subject to legal fees in the probate process. With a living trust, it bypasses the whole probate process and all assets can be immediately accessed by the beneficiaries. As opposed to a will, a living trust is private so it does not go through a probate process, therefore it is NOT a public record. Things that can be listed in a living trust include: stocks, bonds, real estate, life insurance, personal property, etc.

A trust is beneficial for estate planning for those who have large amounts of assets. By establishing a specific living trust known as an A-B Trust, an individual can reduce the amount of taxes paid significantly. For example, in 2012, the current estate tax is $5.12M with a cap at 35% over the $5.12M. In an A-B Trust with a couple passing their assets to their one kid, they would designate half the fund to the surviving spouse and the other half to the kid. The surviving spouse and the kid will then each receive a tax break of $5.12M giving a sheltered total of $10.24M from estate taxes. When the surviving spouse passes, then his/her half is giving to the kid who is then subject to another $5.12M tax break. Unlike a trust, a will however will be only have a tax break of $5.12M.

Conclusion

When comparing the differences of having a last will versus a living trust, it shows that the trust comes out on top. A trust will help to give privacy, immediate access to assets from beneficiaries, AND tax breaks. For those who are near the age of deciding what to pass on to their children or know someone in that situation, help them understand the difference of the two and sway them toward a living trust if feasible!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jonathan_R_Wong

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Saturday, October 7, 2017

FAQs - Know More About DUI Record Expungement and Get Your Life Back on Track



Most states in the US allow DUI record expungement. Expunging your DUI arrest or conviction record eliminates all the consequences it has in your life and helps getting your life back on track. To help you in regards to expungement, this article answers some of the most frequently asked questions.
DUI record expungement - Frequently Asked Questions:
1. What does expunging your DUI record mean?
DUI expungement is a legal process through which your DUI arrest or conviction record is completely physically destroyed.
2. Are you eligible for an expungement?
You are eligible to expunge your DUI record:
- if a certain amount of time has passed since your arrest or conviction.
- if you have completed all the terms and conditions of probation.
- if you have no new pending charges.
- if you have paid all the fines, completed jail time, community service, rehab and fulfilled all the conditions imposed by the court.
3. What will you benefit from expungement?
Once you are notified that your DUI records are expunged, you are, thereafter, to be relieved of all the disabilities resulting from your DUI arrest or conviction.
It means you do not have to disclose your conviction or arrest to your prospective private employer or when applying for a home mortgage loan or under any other circumstances.
4. How much does expungement cost?
Hiring an attorney to expunge your DUI records costs around $400 to $4000 depending on many factors like the nature of your charges i.e., misdemeanor or felony, number of charges and experience of your DUI expungement attorney. In addition to this, court and filing fees can cost $100 to $400.
5. Do you need an attorney for expunging your DUI record?
You can expunge your DUI record with or without the help of an attorney. A DUI expungement attorney ensures that your records get expunged on time. So if you can afford an attorney fee you can hire one. Otherwise you must make sure every phase in the expungement process is completed on time and correctly.
6. Will they need your presence at the court?
If you have hired an attorney, he/she will take care of all the matters on your behalf. But if you have not, you must represent yourself in the court.
7. How long does the DUI expungement process take?
If you want to expunge your misdemeanor record, it will take roughly 2 to 6 weeks from the time the application is filed.
Or if you want to expunge your felony record or want to reduce it to a misdemeanor it usually takes 4 to 6 weeks from the time the application is filed.
8. What expungement will not do for you?
Your expunged DUI arrest or conviction can still be used to increase your penalties and punishments if you get another DUI in the future.
Now that you know the answers for some of the most frequently asked questions, so you can take steps to expunge your existing or older DUI conviction and arrest record and get your life back on track.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4339215

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Making a Will - What You Should Know About Creating a Will


A will is an important document for any person to have. This document simply provides directions on how your property will be handled when you pass on. Many times, when people die without a will in place, a lot of misunderstandings can arise within the family and the community at large. It is therefore important to specify how one's property or estate will be handled to avoid these misunderstandings.

A will writing service is important to help you come up with your will. It is possible for you to write your will without any help but if you are not familiar with this process, you need guidance so that you can write a will correctly.

The first thing you need to do is identify a good will writing service that has the requisite experience and reputation to ease the process of making a will. There are a number of benefits that you will get when you work with a will writing service. Some of these benefits include:

• Correct Structure

Certain things are required when you are drawing up your will. You must indicate that you are of the right age and of sound mind. You must also indicate that this is your last will and testament. You still are able to amend your will at any time you wish to.

These services will also help you to understand technical terms used when writing a will. A man writing a will is called a testator while a woman is called a testatrix. The will has to be signed by the testatrix or the testator and signed by two other witnesses.

• Tax Implications

Certain assets or estates can have tax implications. If you leave your estate to someone else other than your spouse, they might be required to pay taxes on it. It is important to know this in advance and plan for it accordingly.

• Will Execution

Another important aspect to consider is the executor of the will. This is the person who will carry out the terms of the will should you pass on. The person who helps you write the will can also be the executor if they have that capacity. If not, you should name the person or company to carry out this function.

Making a will should not be a problem for you. With the right people to help you, this process will be easy. It will allow you to rest well knowing that your estate will be handled correctly when you pass on.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Tony_M_Mason/1175640

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Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Use a Power of Attorney and a Medical Directive to Appoint Someone You Trust to Act on Your Behalf


Many begin arranging their estate plans when they retire. But they should also arrange for what happens when they become unable to make decisions but are still living.

Dementia and other afflictions leading to mental disabilities destroy our ability to act for ourselves - such as handling our financial and medical decisions. If you haven't formally assigned someone to make those decisions for you, someone else will - and may not make the kind of decisions you'd like.

But you can only choose someone to act for you when you're mentally competent. So, below, I discuss the type of powers of attorney you can assign to anyone to act for you.

When you assign a power of attorney to someone, he can then act on your behalf. That person does not have to be a lawyer. It can be anyone who's of legal age and who you trust to handle decisions as you would want them handled.

Most often, you'll need to validate this assignment with a signed - and possibly notarized - written document since hospitals, banks and the IRS generally want proof when someone else is acting for you.

According to the wording of your assignment, you can limit the area and time for which you assign the power of attorney. You may assign one person a power of attorney to handle your financial affairs, and another person to handle your heath-related decisions.

You can assign someone to begin acting for you under his power of attorney at any time. But since we're concerned with the circumstance of you becoming mentally incompetent to act, let's review some different types of powers of attorney you can choose from.

A Limited Power of Attorney means someone you choose can act for you to handle some restricted area of your life such as paying bills, handling financial decision, or investing. You'd have to specify those areas clearly.

A General Power of Attorney is not restricted to any single area. So whoever you chose can act for you in all respects.

Any power of attorney will cease when you become mentally incompetent unless you specify otherwise. Two types of powers of attorney remain in effect under your incompetence - which is the point of this article.

A Durable Power of Attorney keeps your assignment valid even when you become incapacitated. So be sure to make your assignment 'durable' if that's your intention.

A Springing Power of Attorney comes into effect only when you become incapacitated - and not before. Of course, for this power of attorney to come into effect some 'proof' that you are sufficiently incapacitated will be required. This may require a doctor's letter and some court action if necessary.

It might happen that someone you to whom you assign a power of attorney may be unscrupulous and will waste or steal your assets. This can happen if you're elderly and slowing down about things. So, if you're unsure of how someone will handle your affairs, you may want to grant him power of attorney while you're in good mental health to see how he performs. That's not a bad idea, in any case, since you can discuss with him what you think of his decisions to help frame his future ones.

Unless you make a power of attorney irrevocable, you can revoke it simply be telling that person his assignment is revoked. But be sure to notify others that the power was revoked, too.

Health Care-Related Power of Attorney When you become incapacitated, you may want some one to make health-related decisions for you. You do this with a Medical Durable Power of Attorney. This is also called a Health Care Proxy. It takes effect only when you require medical treatment and your physician determines that you can't communicate your wishes concerning treatment.

Again, you must execute this document when you're competent. Your health care proxy ensures your instructions will be carried out. Some states differ on what decisions can be included in a health care proxy. So check the rules in your state.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Shane_Flait

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Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Irrevocable Vs Revocable Trust


Establishing a living trust is critical to the ability to protect your assets and beneficiaries when you die. But many people don't know that there are two types of trusts - irrevocable trusts and revocable trusts. With irrevocable trusts, the grantor's assets are moved out of the estate. In a revocable trust, assets stay in the grantor's estate. There are advantages to each type depending on the grantor's specific circumstances. Here is a rundown on the differences between the two types of trusts.

Irrevocable Trust

Most people are unaware of the advantages that this type of trust provides:

  • Asset Protection - Moves assets out of the grantor's hands, keeping it safe from lawsuits or creditors. A trustee has the power to make decisions with or without the input of the grantor.
  • No Estate Taxes - Many people are attracted to these trusts because they are protected from federal estate taxes.
  • No Capital Gains Taxes - A skilled lawyer will be able to move assets into irrevocable trusts so as to avoid capital gains taxes. This cannot occur with revocable trust.

Before placing assets into this type of trust, make sure that the grantor will never need them. While it is possible to retrieve assets, it is very difficult and time consuming.

Revocable Trust

Most people have an idea of what this type of trust is. Grantors without complicated tax issues that want to still maintain control over their assets, often choose to have a this trust.

  • Mental Disability - Individuals who fear that they will one day be incapacitated, may want to designate a trustee to handle their assets which can include extensive instructions that the trustee must carry out. This is called a Disability Trustee.
  • To Protect Beneficiaries and Property - Keeps your property and assets out of probate. This ensures that your documents stay private and out of the public record. If privacy is important to you, consider a Revocable Living Trust as opposed to a Last Will and Testament which becomes a matter of public record that can be seen by anyone.
  • To Avoid Probate - Assets at the time of a person's death will pass directly to the beneficiaries named in the trust agreement and avoid probate.
  • For Flexibility - These types of trusts can be changed. If you have a second thought about a particular item or beneficiary, you can modify the document through a trust amendment. If you don't like the trust as a whole, then you can revoke the entire document.
Word of Caution: These trusts offer not creditor protection. If the asset holder is sued, the items in the trust are fair game. Upon your death, those assets will be subject to federal and state estate taxes.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kathryn_McDowell

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Monday, October 2, 2017

Tax Benefits of an LLC Business - Why you NEED a LLC


Tax Deduction rules on what you can and can't write off.

Tax Benefits of an LLC Business - Why you NEED a LLC

Sunday, October 1, 2017

Deeds - Some Ways To Make Changes - By the People



Rene at By the People talks about Deeds of trust and how they can help people make the necessary changes to their title for a number of different reasons. Call 707-428-9871 with any questions, and visit the website at http://www.bythepeopleca.com

Saturday, September 30, 2017

What Are the Different Business Legal Structures?


There are several common legal structures that you can set your business up under. Which one you chose is going to depend on what kind of business you are setting up, who else is involved in this plan with you, your own personal preferences, among several other factors.

Here is a quick overview of your options.

Sole Proprietorship

This is still the most common type of business structure, particularly for small businesses that are just starting out. This means that one person owns and is responsible for the business. They make all the decisions, but they also hold all the financial responsibility. The profits or losses from the business are reported on the proprietor's personal taxes.

General Partnership

This is very similar to a sole proprietorship, except that there is more than one person involved in owning and operating the business. The business is still connected to you, but also to your partners. This means you all share in the management and financial responsibilities of the business.

Corporation (LTD or INC)

A corporation is an entity that is formed and does business on its own, separate from anyone personally. This means that the financial situation of the business does not roll over onto the person who owns the business.

While this may seem like the better option to avoid personal liability if something happens within the business, it can be extremely tedious and expensive to set up and maintain. This is not a viable option for most small business owners because most of them cannot afford the set up fees or maintenance of records required.

Limited Liability Company/Corporation (LLC)

This is a newer and very popular type of business structure because it offers the benefits of a corporation, does not require a lot of the same hassle. Unlike a limited liability partnership, you can set up this type of company with only one person. It provides a lot of the financial protection of a corporation, but does not require as extensive measures to upkeep.

Limited Liability Partnership (LLP)

This is a different type of partnership, but it also provides some of the financial protection of a corporation. Unlike an LLC, you must have at least two partners. However, it is easier to maintain and keep your structure than an LLC. This business structure is also much more common in the UK, which LLCs are more popular in the US.

How you set up your business is an important decision. The structure you choose could make a big financial and legal difference. It will depend on many factors, including local laws. Take the time to research your options and talk to an accountant or other business professional and anyone else involved in your business before making your decision.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Eric_D_Cooper/1217463

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Friday, September 29, 2017

Three Lessons on Durable Powers of Attorney


Durable Powers of attorney are an essential ingredient in a complete estate plan, which allow for continued financial management in the event of incapacity. Under a durable power of attorney, an attorney in fact makes financial decisions on behalf of the principal. The attorney in fact can be given broad and sweeping powers. Conversely, powers granted by a durable power of attorney can be limited to particular assets or powers. Accordingly, the level of control given to the attorney in fact should reflect the particular requirements of the estate as well as the principal's comfort with a broad grant of authority. In this article, the author teaches three lessons on effective execution and implementation of durable powers of attorney.

First Lesson: Why would I Need One Now?

The legality of durable powers of attorney stems from the law of agency. Under agency law principals, an individual with capacity may give an agent powers-to contract, to represent the principal or to revoke or amend a trust, for instance. In the case of a non-durable power, the agency terminates upon the principal's incapacity. Durable powers survive incapacity, but the principal must have capacity at the time of execution in order to effect a valid power. Accordingly, executing a durable power of attorney for financial management should be done prior to incapacity.

Waiting until one becomes unable to coherently express one's wishes with regards to financial management decisions is too late, and a court-appointed conservatorship may become necessary. What about the successor trustee designated in my trust, or the executor of my will? Would they be able to step in? Since the principal does not die at incapacity, only an attorney in fact designated under a properly executed power of attorney may step in to make financial management decisions. A last-minute durable power of attorney executed during incapacity would not survive a court challenge, however expensive or damaging the result.

Second Lesson: Consider making the Power Immediately Effective

Often, unwary estate planners will execute "springing durable powers of attorney," which only become effective upon the incapacity of the principal. Incapacity is determined according to a test set out in the power, such as a determination made by a medical doctor or a court rendered decision. But who wants to go through the expense, difficulty, and uncertainty of initiating a legal procedure to determine incapacity? Isn't one of the goals of estate planning to prevent unnecessary expense and delay? Moreover, doctors frequently hesitate to make determinations of incapacity because of liability they may face.

In most cases, a better strategy would be to execute an immediately effective durable power of attorney, which gives an attorney in fact the power to make decisions on behalf of the principal without any finding of incapacity. Many are fearful of an immediately effective power of attorney, reasoning that no one should be given such power over their financial affairs unless they are totally incompetent. If they have such a lack of trust for the attorney in fact, why are they executing a power of attorney in the first place? One would think that even more trust would be required when the principal is incompetent and has little influence over the attorney in fact. Finally, simple measures can be taken to avoid disasters before incapacity. Consider sealing a copy of the durable power of attorney in an envelope labeled "do not open until my incapacity." In addition to oral instructions, this can help to avoid the scenario of a run-away attorney in fact who uses the power of attorney to access financial accounts before incapacity.

Third Lesson: What powers should the Attorney-in-Fact be given?

The powers given to an attorney in fact depend upon the principal's desires and the particular concerns that stem from the types of assets held. The durable power of attorney should be coordinated with the will, trust and advance health care directive to ensure that they do not contradict each other. Namely, should the attorney in fact have the power to create trusts? To rescind or amend existing trusts? Should the attorney in fact have a power to make gifts to himself or to others? These powers can help ensure that preparation for long term care (medical) or tax planning can take place even after incapacity. Before executing a power of attorney, individuals should be fully informed of the powers that they are granting, and the possible consequences of such sweeping grants of power. In all cases, it's best to consult with an attorney who can advise on specific risks.

Conclusion

Durable Powers of Attorney are one of the five essential documents in estate planning discussed in this article series. Unlike a will or trust, which mostly deals with decisions that are made upon one's death, the durable power of attorney deals with life-time financial management and estate planning questions. Individuals should be aware of the risk in waiting to execute the power of attorney; the hazards of "springing" powers; the range of powers that can be given to the attorney in fact; and the risks associated with a sweeping grant of authority to the attorney in fact. --

This article is intended to provide general information about estate planning strategies and should not be relied upon as a substitute for legal advice from a qualified attorney. Treasury regulations require a disclaimer that to the extent this article concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/John_C._Martin/176675

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Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Annulment Versus Divorce



There are various ground upon which an annulment or a divorce could be granted by a court. The legal consequences could be very important, since an annulment basically erases a marriage, whereas a divorce simply terminates it.

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Don't Put Off Getting a Power of Attorney


Do you think you need a Power of Attorney? If you think so then don't put it off and take any chances in the future. You need the time now to think about whom you can truly trust and at this point in your life you may find it hard to eliminate some of your closest family members or dearest friends. Just consider this, you are now mentally stable and it should be more simple to make those decisions now, than it would be in the future when maybe you don't have all of your mental powers with you. Now is the time to safeguard your future financial affairs and secure your assets.

Most of us have the wrong impression of Power of Attorney, we think that only the elderly need one or people with large massive fortunes. Please don't be mislead, we all should consider a Power of Attorney. You will have a form of peace of mind knowing should something happen to you; you will be taken care of legally. You want someone you can trust to look out for your matters.

The vital importance of a Power of Attorney could best be demonstrated by the fact if you should happen to contact a disabling disease which could render you incapable of making your own decisions. Should you have to be hospitalized, you want someone to pay your mortgage and take care of your banking needs; you don't want to loose all that you have worked hard for. A Power of Attorney can protect you legally with the local laws.

The laws are very much in your favor should you ever become incapable of taking care of your affairs. With a Power of Attorney in force, the courts will then step in and use their discretion on who will be in charge of all your affairs. The judge may appoint someone you do not fully trust, so you want to have full control and that is why it is so important to have a Power of Attorney.

So as a good suggestion, the best time for a Power of Attorney is NOW! You want to be protected now, you don't want to wait until it is to late and you don't have the power to help yourself.
So having said that, for your sake, please consider looking into the Power of Attorney aspect for your life.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=John_Estes

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Monday, September 25, 2017

Considerations in Filing for an LLC


Setting up an LLC and other states has become a popular option for many small business owners because of the many benefits it offers. A limited liability company puts together the advantages of a sole proprietorship, a partnership, and a corporation all in one business entity. This means compete control, tax benefits, and limited liability. The interest in LLCs continues to grow as more and more business owners are able to realize its advantages over other business types.

Before starting an LLC, there are some considerations that should be kept in mind. Taking note of these considerations will ensure that the processing of its registration with the appropriate government agencies will go faster and smoother. When the paperwork is completed properly, there will be no questions as to the LLC's legality.

First, the members filing for LLC should decide on the name of the business. This should meet the standards in LLC names set by the state government. To know the availability and aptness of the name, the business name database can be utilized for verification. Also, the name for an LLC can be reserved for four months by filing an application as well.

The next step is submitting the LLC's Articles of Organization. These articles should include all the necessary information about the LLC such as the name and address of LLC, its registered agent, and its duration. Also, how the LLC will be managed and who will manage the LLC should be stated in the Articles of Organization. Under the law, these are all filed with the office of the Secretary of State through mail.

The Operating Agreement should be processed after the filing of the Articles of Organization. Though this is not required by the state's government, it is still highly advisable. This is essential to define each member's responsibilities and liabilities. With Operating Agreement, the members can be protected from being personally liable if ever the business becomes bankrupt. Aside from the statement of responsibilities and liabilities, other information can be included as well. This includes the business nature, concept, and mission statement.

Lastly, business permits and licenses should be acquired. These vary depending on state laws. The business licenses that need to be obtained depend on the nature of the business and its location. Aside from that, the LLC businesses are all required to submit annual reports. This is also submitted to the Secretary of State on the designated date and can be done through mail or online filing. Knowing about all these requirements will help business owners keep track of their filing schedules to ensure that they are always compliant with all the government's documentation and reportorial requirements.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Pete_Morgan

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Saturday, September 23, 2017

LLC Vs Sole Proprietorship: Which Is Right for You?


Most small business owners in the United States operate as a sole proprietorship, the default business entity. While this may work for some businesses for some time, it does not create any legal separation between your business and your personal assets. You will face both the risk of lawsuits and the potential of business debt that you cannot afford. Operating as a sole proprietorship is a risk that grows with your business.

If you want to protect your business and yourself forming an LLC is one affordable option that offers many benefits.

What is a Limited Liability Company?

If you form an LLC, you will create a separate entity that offers liability protection for owners. Your personal assets like your home and savings will not be at risk if your business is sued or has debts it cannot pay, provided you maintain the LLC and meet legal requirements. A limited liability company provides flexibile management options and it operates as a pass-through entity by default. This means that forming an LLC from a sole proprietorship will not change your taxes at all, if you have one member.

Choosing an LLC may also offer you additional benefits. You will find it easier to raise capital through investors, and you have the ability to deduct health insurance premiums. Self employment tax is based on net income and you can be taxed as a partnership or a corporation, if you choose.
Because it is very affordable to form a limited liability company and offers many important protections, it is the most popular choice for small business owners.

What is a Sole Proprietorship?

Sole proprietorships have one owner and they are not legal entities. This means that operating a sole proprietorship offers no distinction under the law between your business liabilities and assets and personal liabilities and assets. If there are business debts or a lawsuit that you cannot pay through business assets, your home, savings and other assets will then be at risk.

There are benefits to remaining a sole proprietorship, depending on your situation. Taxes are straightforward, you do not need to register with the state or file annual paperwork, and payroll can be much easier to set up. There will be no compliance issues to worry about, either.

Which is Right for You?

The choice between a sole proprietorship and LLC depends on your business. If you have a very low-risk business that does not involve working in people's homes, offering advice or selling products, remaining a sole proprietorship may be your best move. This is especially true if you are very unlikely to incur great liabilities. If you are concerned about keeping your business and personal finances and assets separate, however, or you plan to expand or take on debts, it is worth considering forming a limited liability in your state or in another state.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Christine_Layton/1274248

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Thursday, September 21, 2017

Advance Healthcare Directives - Be Sure to Write Your Living Will


With modern medical technology advancements, it is becoming more and more important to consider writing an advanced healthcare directive. There are several kinds of advanced healthcare directives. A living will is one form of an advanced healthcare directive. It is a document that specifies what you want done medically if you are no longer capable of making decisions for yourself. A medical power of attorney or healthcare proxy is another form that appoints a specific person to make decisions for you if you are incapacitated. It is advised that a person have both documents prepared and in place long before they will ever be needed.

With today's advancement in medical care many people are left confined to nursing homes. Many elderly are in a vegetative state, fed through feeding tubes while their bodies slowly die. The emotional and financial burden the families of these patients experience is overwhelming. Lives are prolonged but there is no real quality of life. An advanced directive can prevent this from happening to those you love.

The living will was first proposed by Luis Kutner in 1969. His purpose was to make sure the living were able to make their wishes known when they were no longer able to speak for themselves. The living will gives direction to medical professionals about what procedures a person wants and doesn't want. It can forbid the use of medical equipment used to sustain life or direct it be discontinued when it only prolongs death. It can be general or specific depending on the wishes of the person writing it.

Advanced directives should be regularly updated to make sure they cover current medical technology. As advancements are made, changes need to be made to reflect that advancement. A living will that is current is more likely to be acknowledged and followed.

It is advised that a living will be combined with a healthcare proxy to assure your wishes are followed. No document can fully cover all the circumstances that might occur. Having a person on the scene making immediate decisions is important. By designating a person in advance to make decisions, you can be reassured that no decisions are made that might conflict with your desires.

The comfort and peace of mind an advanced healthcare directive gives is invaluable. Knowing you will not be a burden to your family allows you to calmly live knowing any necessary medical decisions will be made by someone you trust.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Bryan_Sims

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Wednesday, September 20, 2017

What You Should Know About Annulment


An annulment is a declaration by the circuit court that there is a defect int he marriage such that the marriage is void. Contrary to popular belief, you cannot have your marriage annulled because you did not consummate the union or because you changed your mind shortly after the ceremony. To qualify for an annulment there must be a defect which goes to the heart of the marriage. If the marriage is valid, the only recourse is to file for divorce. A divorce dissolves a valid marriage, whereas an annulment recognizes and declares a marriage to be so defective as to be non-existent.

A marriage may be void or voidable. The grounds for the annulment determine whether the marriage is void or voidable.

Void Marriages~The following marriages are void from the start and consequently not recognized at law: 1) a marriage to someone who is already married and 2) marriage to a close relative. Under these circumstances, the marriage is void from the start. Either party may petition the court for an annulment. There is no limitation as to when the suit may be filed. It is important to note that if one party was married to someone else at the time of the marriage, the subsequent death of the other spouse or the subsequent divorce from that spouse will not validate the marriage. The only way to validate the marriage in such a case is to remarry after the problem has been resolved.

Voidable Marriages~A voidable marriage is legally valid unless one of the spouses files for an annulment. Marriages are voidable, if one of the spouses: 1) was physically or mentally incompetent at the time of the marriage, 2) consented to the marriage under fraud or duress, 3) was a felon or prostitute without the other's knowledge, 4) was impotent, 5) was pregnant by another man without the other spouse's knowledge, or 6) fathered a child by another woman within 10 months of the marriage without the other spouse's knowledge. Please note that it is the "wronged" spouse who has the grounds for annulment and not the spouse who perpetrated the fraud.

Unlike void marriage, courts will not grant an annulment of a voidable marriage if the spouses continue to cohabit or live together as husband and wife after discovery and knowledge of the circumstances constituting grounds for the annulment. If there is cohabitation with knowledge of the circumstances or if you have lived with your spouse for two years or more before filing a petition for annulment, you will be required to file for a divorce instead of an annulment. We had the unpleasant task of telling a man who had been married five years that although he had grounds to annul his voidable marriage, he waited too long to file for annulment. He had to file for divorce.

The Procedure~The procedure for an annulment is the same as for a divorce. The only procedural difference is the grounds for the law suit. However, the relief available in an annulment is different tan in a divorce.

The Relief~While the court may make a temproary order for spousal support and attorney's fees, curing the pendency of the annulment suit, the court has no authority to grant post-annulment "spousal support" or equitable division of property and debts. If there are children, the court may rule on custody and child support, even if the marriage is void.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Virginia_Perry/452094

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Monday, September 18, 2017

What Happens if a Person Dies Without a Will?


If someone dies without leaving a valid Will, the person is said to have died intestate - that's legalese for without a will - the property she held in her own name as his or her own separate property passes to the person or persons specified in the laws of the deceased's state of residence, after any bills and taxes are taken care of.

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Business Laws : Forming an LLC



Forming a LLC, or limited liability company, requires contacting the Small Business Administration to find out what type of licenses and registrations are needed to be filed.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Why You Should Integrate a Family Trust with Your Business



Utilizing a Revocable Living Trust can be an affordable way to ensure your business passes effectively to your family or loved ones upon your death.

Friday, September 15, 2017

Legal Document Preparation - By The People


Rene talks about how By The People Document Preparation Service in Fairfield CA can help people with uncontested legal matters in an inexpensive way. See more at http://www.bythepeopleca.com, or call 707-428-9871

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Can You Afford Effective Estate Planning?


"Can I Afford Effective Estate Planning?"

That's Really Not the Right Question.

What you should be asking yourself is: "Can I Afford Not to Do It?"

You may be asking yourself whether you can really afford to do the effective estate planning that you know needs to be done. That's not the question to ask. The real question is whether you and your family can afford to be without the protection and security that the right planning provides.

Would you drive without car insurance? How would you feel without the protection that liability and property coverage offers??

Would you leave your home uninsured?

Would you go without health insurance, knowing that any major medical bills could wipe you out?
In the case of the car, home, and health insurance, you're protecting against the possibility of something happening. If an insured event occurs, then your insurance will cover you, and the premiums you paid for the insurance will be more than worth it.

Estate planning is protecting against the possibility that you might become incapacitated during your lifetime, and the certainty that you will pass away one day.

So what protection and security does the right kind of planning provide?

Protecting You if You Become Incapacitated. If you become incapacitated and need help managing your financial affairs and your medical care, the people you want helping you will need the proper legal documents in order to have the authority to act for you.

Protecting Your Loved Ones. The right kind of estate planning will protect your loved ones from any of the following:

  • Creditors - whether they have creditor problems now, or some that arise in the future.
  • Predators - people who would take advantage of them after they receive an inheritance from you.
  • Poor Financial Judgment - sometimes our loved ones just aren't good at handling money.
  • Loss of Benefits - if you have a loved one with Special Needs, then having the right plan will protect their continuing benefits.
  • Family Feuds - Unfortunately, when your planning is not done correctly, horrible feuds can arise between family members, even among siblings who previously got along.
  • Divorce Loss - if one of your loved ones got divorced, would you want their ex-spouse to receive half of their inheritance? Without proper planning, that can happen.
  • Blended Families - in families where there are children from other marriages, then the right estate planning will protect against one side of the family being inadvertently disinherited.
Protecting Your Assets. The right planning will protect your assets from unnecessary expenses, and the potential for loss from creditors or a nursing home spend-down.

  • Probate Expense - If your estate goes through Probate, then your family will pay a much higher cost to administer your estate. The attorney fee to pay in Probate is calculated as a percentage of your assets, starting as high as 4.5%. For example, in Lucas County, the attorney fee for probating a $400,000 estate (gross value) would be $15,000. With the right planning, that cost could be significantly reduced, resulting in savings of up to $11,000!
  • Creditors or Long Term Care Spend Down. If you're concerned about the potential for losing your savings to a nursing home, and if long term care insurance is not an option for you, then the right kind of estate planning can help protect a large portion of your assets and preserve them for your loved ones.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Richard_M_Chamberlain

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Wednesday, September 13, 2017

What Is Probate in Relation to a Will?



A will is a legal document that outlines what one would want to happen after their death in terms of their funeral, care for their children and most important of all, distribution of their estate. When a person dies having drafted their will, they are said to have died testate in legal terms. The opposite of this would be dying intestate. A will usually specifically states the name of an executor, a person entrusted by the testator or testatrix with the task of executing the will after their death. An executor could be a close family member, a relative, trusted friend or even an attorney. An executor is usually referred to as a 'representative of the estate in probate' in a will in order to cover executors of both gender.
A will is very important because it makes things a lot easier for the family of a deceased person especially when it comes to estate distribution issues. A will reduces the possibility of disagreement or misunderstanding between family members when trying to figure out the deceased's death wishes. Administering a will is however not as easy as it may sound. This is because the law requires wills to be validated by a court which could take a couple of months to do. Validation of a will is done by the executor by applying for a Grant of Probate in a probate court.
Probate is the legal process of identifying, validating and distributing the estate of a deceased person under strict court supervision. The probate process includes payment of outstanding debts to creditors and payment of outstanding taxes such as death and inheritance tax. A probate court is a special court that interprets the will and validates any claims on the estate made by third parties such as the creditors of the deceased. The court oversees the probate process right from when the executor files for a grant of probate, up to when it is granted and ownership of the estate is transferred to the beneficiaries.
For the executor of a will to be granted probate, they will have to first present to the probate court registry, the deceased's will and a solicitor approved oath. The oath shows that the executor is committed to administering the wishes stated by the deceased in the will. The executor named in the will is usually not recognized by the law until the probate court officially appoints them as the representative of the estate in probate.
If a will was properly drafted, it takes the court a shorter time to grant probate. Incase the beneficiaries are not completely satisfied with the court's decision, probate law allows them to contest the validity of the will in the same court. In such a case the estate remains frozen until the court makes a validity judgment. In the event of intestate death, or if there is no executor is named in a will, the grant of probate is referred to as a 'Letter of Administration'. It is also acquired through a court process and is issued to the person that the court deems fittest to execute the will or distribute the estate.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9326024

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Monday, September 11, 2017

Estate Planning : How are Trusts Taxed?



In estate law, trusts are taxed differently depending on whether they are revocable or irrevocable trusts. Learn how a trust is taxed from an estate planning and probate lawyer in this free video on estate law.

Sunday, September 10, 2017

Power of Attorney = Power in Your Hands


If you manage your property remotely and use a local trusted friend or family member to handle the rental issues for you, you need a contract or a power of attorney. It is a contract involving the details on the work and the compensation in return. It should also define what happens in the case the contract is breached.

With a power of attorney, you grant the person permission and authority to make decisions on behalf of you. Your power of attorney is like a backup and you can revoke it any time you want.

The power of attorney can be very general or specific. To protect yourself, you should always use a limited power of attorney. A good limited power of attorney document for a rental property should specify the expiration date, the property on which it is authorized, and acts permitted. You can customize this according to your needs.

For an ongoing property management purposes, you can specify the expiration date for a year or two. On the other hand, if you are on vacation or just want your power of attorney to sign the lease with the tenant, you can set the dates for a shorter period of time.

You also want to restrict the properties your power of attorney has the authority on by specifying the address of the property. Or if you allow him/her to act on all the rental properties in a city or state, you can put this in the document.

Other important things to spell out in the power of attorney are the kinds of delegations you grant. You might allow your power of attorney to lease the property only, but not collect future rent payments for you. You might give the power to them to furnish the property or adjust the rent or not. It is entirely up to you to decide how much or little power you grant to your power of attorney.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Cliff_Tyler/570409

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Saturday, September 9, 2017

Understanding of Probate - The Process of Assets Transfer After a Person's Death


When someone dies, his or her assets should go through probate. The probate process includes collecting the deceased's assets, paying off liabilities and necessary taxes, and administering property to heirs as per the will.

Probate of decedent's Will

During this process, authenticity of the deceased's will is to be proved in the court of law. Will of a deceased must be probated soon after his or her death. Nobody has a right to hold it back at any cost.
The decedent's attorney or the person possessing the will of decreased, will need to produce it immediately, or within the specified time. There are penalties for destroying or concealing the will.

Probate Proceedings

The procedure starts only when there is the involvement of an official executor. If you are well versed with the different kinds of laws that are involved, then you can submit your application to be the executor on behalf of the friends or relatives.
  • The first thing to do here is to file a formal request. The applications should be submitted in the local court of the same country, where the deceased lived the last days of his or her life. Along with filing the probation documents, you should also produce the original death certificate of the deceased.
  • After filing the documents in the court, it the next step is to inform the creditors of the deceased. You can advertise about the probate in the newspapers, or on any other such local media.
  • You can let the heirs and beneficiaries of the departed know about the probate process, by mailing the court notice to their respective mailing address or by emailing it to them. You will need to document every notification sent to the successors who are in the line, and submit them to the court before the probate process commences.
You can complete all the procedures within the nine months duration, which is after the date of death of your client. There are many benefits from letting your client know beforehand about what will happen with his or her possessions after death.
  • The distribution of property among the beneficiaries will take place only after clearing off the debts taken by the diseased from different sources.
  • The entire process will be completed with transferring of the deceased's possessions to the rightful beneficiaries.
The inheritance money will be handed over to the next successor in line in many ways such as, funeral expenses, debt and taxes, family allowances, costs of estate administration, etc.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Rajesh_B_Sanghvi

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Friday, September 8, 2017

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Naming Of Guardianship In Wills


When there are minor children, a Will should always be used to name a guardian(s) of their persons and property. This guardian is who will be taking care of them in your absence and will also have control over their finances, both from you and for their well being. This guardian that you appoint, needless to say, is someone that you must be able to trust completely with your children and someone who will make sure that they are cared for in the way that you have planned. This person "can" of course be someone other than your X.

Alternate guardians should also be named in the even that the original guardian is for whatever reason unable to assume responsibility. Naming of guardians and alternates should not be done any other way but in a Will. This will relieve any hint of confusion after you are not able to take care of your kids yourself. Of course, if there is a surviving parent that person will be automatically named guardian if living in the same household; but, if your will specifies a different person to control the money, then this can fit your goals quite nicely.

This situation can and often gets tricky in divorce cases. Since you are divorced, the parent with legal custody of the child(ren) should designate a guardian. If you are the legal guardian, then you have the authority to designate who will care for your children after you die. Understand, however, that if somebody besides the other biological parent is named, this decision might not be binding.

When a custodial parent dies, the non-custodial parent always has priority in seeking guardianship and custody, unless that person is deemed unfit to perform the duties necessary or is unsafe to leave with children. If you are set against your "X" getting custody of your children if you were to die, you need to make sure that you or your appointed guardian will be able to prove that your "X" is unfit or unable to perform the job.

However, be aware that the court will probably have to approve who you have proposed to be the legal guardian eventually even if named in your Will. The purpose of your Will in this regard, though, is to guide the court in its judgment. It will also help avoid family arguments over who is better qualified to raise your children and will give the person you choose the authority over all others.


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